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First method (parallelize inner loop):

for(j=0; j<LATTICE_VW; ++j) {
    x = j*DX + LATTICE_W;
    #pragma omp parallel for ordered private(y, prob)
        for(i=0; i<LATTICE_VH; ++i) {
            y = i*DY + LATTICE_S;
            prob = psi[i][j].norm();

            #pragma omp ordered
                out << x << " " << y << " " << prob << endl;
        }
}

Second method (parallelize outer loop):

#pragma omp parallel for ordered private(x, y, prob)
    for(j=0; j<LATTICE_VW; ++j) {
        x = j*DX + LATTICE_W;
        for(i=0; i<LATTICE_VH; ++i) {
            y = i*DY + LATTICE_S;
            prob = psi[i][j].norm();

            #pragma omp ordered
                out << x << " " << y << " " << prob << endl;
        }
    }

Third method (parallelize collapsed loops)

#pragma omp parallel for collapse(2) ordered private(x, y, prob)
    for(j=0; j<LATTICE_VW; ++j) {
        for(i=0; i<LATTICE_VH; ++i) {
            x = j*DX + LATTICE_W;
            y = i*DY + LATTICE_S;
            prob = psi[i][j].norm();

            #pragma omp ordered
                out << x << " " << y << " " << prob << endl;
        }
    }

If I was going to guess I would say that method 3 should be the fastest.

However method 1 is the fastest, while both the second and third take about the same ammount of time as if there was no parallelization. Why does this happens?

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Are you getting correct output from method 2? The variables y and prob should probably be private there too. –  Novelocrat Jan 20 '13 at 22:15
    
Sorry, they are private there. Just edited it –  Luís Sintra Jan 26 '13 at 23:26
    
What are the trip counts for the inner and outer loops ? –  High Performance Mark Jan 26 '13 at 23:32
    
And what sort of timings do you get if you omit the ordered directive and the line of code it covers ? –  High Performance Mark Jan 27 '13 at 0:14
    
What if you flip the inner and outer loop? I see you are accessing psi[i][j] and iterating j then i. –  yiding Jan 27 '13 at 0:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Look with this:

for(int x = 0; x < 4; ++x)
  #pragma omp parallel for ordered
  for(int y = 0; y < 4; ++y)
    #pragma omp ordered
    cout << x << ',' << y << " (by thread " << omp_get_thread_num() << ')' << endl;

you have:

0,0 (by thread 0)
0,1 (by thread 1)
0,2 (by thread 2)
0,3 (by thread 3)
1,0 (by thread 0)
1,1 (by thread 1)
1,2 (by thread 2)
1,3 (by thread 3)

Each thread just has to wait for some cout all the work before can be done in parallel. But with:

#pragma omp parallel for ordered
for(int x = 0; x < 4; ++x)
  for(int y = 0; y < 4; ++y)
    #pragma omp ordered
    cout << x << ',' << y << " (by thread " << omp_get_thread_num() << ')' << endl;

and

#pragma omp parallel for collapse(2) ordered
for(int x = 0; x < 4; ++x)
  for(int y = 0; y < 4; ++y)
    #pragma omp ordered
    cout << x << ',' << y << " (by thread " << omp_get_thread_num() << ')' << endl;

the situations is:

0,0 (by thread 0)
0,1 (by thread 0)
0,2 (by thread 0)
0,3 (by thread 0)
1,0 (by thread 1)
1,1 (by thread 1)
1,2 (by thread 1)
1,3 (by thread 1)
2,0 (by thread 2)
2,1 (by thread 2)
2,2 (by thread 2)
2,3 (by thread 2)
3,0 (by thread 3)
3,1 (by thread 3)
3,2 (by thread 3)
3,3 (by thread 3)

So thread 1 has to wait for thread 0 to finish all its work, before it can cout the first time, and nearly nothing can be done in parallel.

Try adding schedule(static,1) to the collapse-version and it should perform at least as good as the first version does.

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