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So, I've run across an interesting problem while working on a Web application for the Microsoft Surface.

I want to add event listeners for when a user interacts with a DOM element. Now I can do:

if ('ontouchstart' in document.documentElement) {
  //Attach code for touch event listeners
  document.addEventListener("touchstart" myFunc, false);
} else {
  //Attach code for mouse event listeners
  document.addEventListener("mousedown" myFunc, false);
}

If the device didn't have a mouse input, this problem would be simple and the above code would work just fine. But the Surface (and many new Windows 8 computers) have BOTH a touch and mouse input. So the above code would only work when the user touched the device. The mouse event listeners would never be attached.

So then I thought, well, I could do this:

if ('ontouchstart' in document.documentElement) {
  //Attach code for touch event listeners
  document.addEventListener("touchstart" myFunc, false);
}
//Always attach code for mouse event listeners
document.addEventListener("mousedown" myFunc, false);

Devices that don't support touch wouldn't have the events attached, but a device that uses touch will register its handlers. The problem with this though is that myFunc() will be called twice on a touch device:

  1. myFunc() will fire when "touchstart" is raised
  2. Because touch browsers typically go through the cycle touchstart -> touchmove -> touchend -> mousedown -> mousemove -> mouseup -> click, myFunc() will be called again in "mousedown"

I've considered adding code tomyFunc() such that it calls e.preventDefault() but this seems to also block touchend as well as mousedown / mousemove / mouseup on some browsers (link).

I hate doing useragent sniffers, but it seems as if touch browsers have variations in how touch events are implemented.

I must be missing something because it seems that surely these JavaScript implementations were decided with possibility of a browser supporting both a mouse and touch!

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marked as duplicate by userx, Danubian Sailor, user568109, RGraham, Sergio Aug 5 '13 at 11:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What does this have to do with Android, considering that the Surface does not run Android? –  CommonsWare Jan 18 '13 at 19:58
    
@CommonsWare - My question is pertinent to all touch devices that support a mouse as well, hence it seems applicable to Windows 8 and Android. –  userx Jan 18 '13 at 20:13
    
Yeah, what about chromeOS? –  Chris Love Feb 18 '13 at 13:10
    
It's been 2 months. You figure anything out? –  jedmao Apr 12 '13 at 8:43
    
This is not a duplicate of "How to bind 'touchstart' and 'click' events but not respond to both?" which is a jQuery-specific question with jQuery-specific answers. –  Frederik Krautwald Jun 16 at 17:25

3 Answers 3

For windows 8 you can use the "MSPointerDown " event.

 if (window.navigator.msPointerEnabled) {
     document.addEventListener("MSPointerDown" myFunc, false);
 }

Also add the following to your style:

  html { 
    -ms-touch-action: none; /* Direct all pointer events to JavaScript code. */
  }

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/hh673557(v=vs.85).aspx for more info.

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Inside myFunc, check the event type. If it's touchstart, then do e.stopPropagation().

function myFunc(e) {
    if (e.type === 'touchstart') {
        e.stopPropagation();
    }
    //the rest of your code here
}
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This unfortunately doesn't work either because it could be a "mousedown" event on a Windows 8 laptop which has both a mouse and a touch screen. –  userx Jul 23 '13 at 0:31
    
Edited my answer. –  noypiscripter Jul 29 '13 at 19:50

EDITED: If you use jQuery, you will be able to do like this:

var clickEventType=((document.ontouchstart!==null)?'mousedown':'touchstart');

$("a").bind(clickEventType, function() {
    //Do something
});

This will fire only one of the bind's event.

Found here: How to bind 'touchstart' and 'click' events but not respond to both?

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1  
This doesn't solve the problem. It simply attaches handlers for both events and as such I don't believe it prevents the possibility of BOTH events firing (and hence the attached function firing twice). –  userx Jan 31 '13 at 21:22
    
You are correct –  Chris Love Feb 18 '13 at 13:08

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