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I am learning OOP and have a question about what is exactly happening with the code below.

I have the classic Dog Animal example going. Dog inherits Animal.

public class Animal
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual string Speak()
    {
        return "Animal Speak";
    }

    public string Hungry()
    {
        return this.Speak();
    }
}


public class Dog : Animal
{
    public override string Speak()
    {
        return "Dog Speak";
    }

    public string Fetch()
    {
        return "Fetch";
    }
}

Both questions are based on this assignment: Animal a = new Dog();

  1. What is actually happening when I declare an Animal and set it to a Dog reference. Is there a specific term for this?
  2. When I call a.Hungry(), the output is "Dog Speak." If the output is "Dog Speak", why can I not call a.Fetch()? What is the term for what's happening here?

Any help and further reading on the particular topic would be greatly appreciated.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted
  1. This is an "upcast". In C# there is an implicit conversion from any type to any of it's base types, so you don't need to do anything to treat a Dog as if it were an Animal. (Thanks to Matt Burland for reminding me that this is the appropriate term.)
  2. Because the type of the variable is Animal, and as such you can only access members that the compiler knows an Animal can access, i.e. Speak and Hungry. It doesn't know that the Animal is a Dog, so it can't call Fetch. The variable would need to be of type Dog for you to be able to call Fetch on it.
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Animal a = new Dog();

Is upcasting. You are creating a Dog object and assigning it to a variable of the parent class. This is allowed, but...

a.Fetch();

Won't work. Why, because Animal doesn't have a method called Fetch, and as far as the compiler knows, a can be any Animal. If you want to call Fetch you will need to cast a back to a Dog

Dog d = (Dog)a;
d.Fetch();

Note however, that this will cause an error if a isn't a Dog, so usually you check first:

if (a is Dog) 
{
    Dog d = (Dog)a;
    d.Fetch();
}

When you call

a.Hungry();

This is allowed, because Animal has a Hungry method. The Hungry method called Speak, but since a is a Dog and not the base Animal, it'll call the Dog.Speak method (this, as Servy pointed out elsewhere, is true polymorphism - the idea the actual code executed when calling a particular method will be different depending on the actual type of the object).

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1  
+1 for being the only person (myself included) to answer #1 correctly. Going to edit my answer now. –  Servy Jan 18 '13 at 19:47
1  
Great informative answer. In addition, if you wanted to have a common Fetch() functionality, you could create an interfaced named IFetchable which contains the Fetch() method. Then Dog would implement it and then you could access it that way. –  SiLo Jan 18 '13 at 20:35
  1. a is an Animal reference and it points to a Dog object. This is a form of polymorphism (subtype polymorphism).

  2. You can't call a.Fetch since a has type Animal and the Fetch method is not defined in your Animal class.

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#1 isn't "polymorphism" as per this comment of mine. If the method wasn't virtual you could still have an upcast (which is the correct answer to #1) even though it would have no polymorphic behavior. –  Servy Jan 18 '13 at 19:59
  1. Your are storing an object of type Dog inside an variable that will accept any Animal. This is called Polymorphism (actually not quite see Servy's comment)
  2. You can only call fetch by first casting the object to a dog

Like so:

Dog dog = (Dog)a;
dog.Fetch();

Otherwise as far as the compiler knows it could be any animal, and not all animals have the method Fetch. Also note the cast would throw an InvalidCastError if it was not actually a Dog object.

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2  
To #1, it's not exactly polymorphism. Polymorphism is the idea that calling a method of a may not be implemented in the definition of the type Animal, it can be (and in this case, is) executing a method defined in a derived type. Therefore the ability to sore a Dog in an Animal isn't polymorphism, the fact that the result of Speak is "Dog Speak", is polymorphism. If the method was not virtual, it would not be polymorphic, and would thus say "Animal Speak", but you can still put a Dog into an Animal variable without polymorphism. –  Servy Jan 18 '13 at 19:45
    
Interesting I actually thought that was the correct use of the term Polymorphism, thanks for the info. Learn something new every day! –  Kevin DiTraglia Jan 18 '13 at 19:54
    
This is actually relevant in C# where you can have non-polymorphic behavior (by not adding virtual). In, for example, Java, you can't have a non-virtual method, so it's not really relevant to make the distinction. –  Servy Jan 18 '13 at 19:55

the word for that is polymorphism

  1. because your animal just happened to be instantiated as a Dog, and it will execute all of Dog's methods. Both Animal and Dog have a Speak method, and Dog inherits Hungry from Animal.Dog's speak method overrides Animal's, so that's what gets executed.

  2. the reason why you can't write a.Fetch is because the compiler doesn't know that at design time.

for example

Animal a;

if(console.ReadLine() == "Dog")
{
    a = new Dog();
}
else
{
    a = new Animal();
}

a.Fetch();

at this point when you call a.Fetch you don't know whether or not a is a dog

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#1 isn't strictly polymorphism. See my comment on KD's answer, or Matt Burland's answer, which is the correct one. –  Servy Jan 18 '13 at 19:46
  1. when you declare an Animal and set it to a dog implicit cast is done
  2. try this code to see the effect of using virtual and not using it.

:

public class Animal
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Speak()
    {
        return "Animal Speak";
    }
    public string Hungry()
    {
        return this.Speak();
    }
}

public class Dog : Animal
{
    public new string Speak()
    {
        return "Dog Speak";
    }
    public string Fetch()
    {
        return "Fetch";
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Animal a = new Dog();
    Console.WriteLine(a.Hungry());   //Animal Speak
    Console.ReadLine();
}
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Your #2 is just a further explanation of #1. You don't answer his question marked #2. –  Servy Jan 18 '13 at 19:57
    
in #1 I tried to answer his #1 sentence. in #2 I want to say when it is possible to reach the Speak Method in the base class. –  Hossein Narimani Rad Jan 18 '13 at 20:02
    
As I said before, you don't answer his second question, which he has marked as #2, in which he asks why a.Fetch is not legal. –  Servy Jan 18 '13 at 20:04
    
in #2 he is surprised why the speak method returns that value! so it seems it has two question in #2. I answered one of them. you also didn't say (in your answer) why the speak method returns "Dog Speak"! –  Hossein Narimani Rad Jan 18 '13 at 20:08
    
No, he wasn't saying he was surprised that it returned that value. He was asking why a.Fetch isn't valid given the behavior of a.Hungry, not asking why a.Hungry returns "Dog Speak" instead of "Animal Speak". –  Servy Jan 18 '13 at 20:09

If you Create an Animal with a Dog, you only create A Animal and Have only the Propertys of Animal. This has an Simply Reason. Just a Example:

public class Animal
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual string Speak()
    {
        return "Animal Speak";
    }

    public string Hungry()
    {
        return this.Speak();
    }
}


public class Dog : Animal
{
    public override string Speak()
    {
        return "Dog Speak";
    }

    public string Fetch()
    {
        return "Fetch";
    }
}

public class Cat: Animal
{
    public override string Speak()
    {
        return "Cat Speak";
    }

    public string Fetch()
    {
        return "Fetch";
    }
}

So if you now Crate a Insance like this:

Animal a = new Dog();

You know that your Animal can Speak and that he is Hungry, Nothing more thats all that you need to know, you can Call a.Speak() and your Animal returns "Dog Speak" buf if you now change a like this: a = new Cat() you can call a.Speak() too but it Return something else ... the same call but different returns. Of course if you are sure that the Animal is really a Dog you can cast it back to the Explicit implementation.

var d= new Dog();
if(a is Dog)
d = a as Dog;

d is now a real Dog and can everything that only a Dog can but you cant assign anymore d as a Cat. Becorse its a Dog and not an Animal

Why as and not Cast?

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