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I'm trying to learn some c++, to start off I created some methods to handle outputing to and reading from a console. I'm having 2 major problems, marked in the code, manipulating/accessing values within a std::vector of strings passed in by reference.

The method below takes in a question (std string) to ask the user and a vector std strings that contain responses from the user deemed acceptable. I also wanted, in the interest of learning, to access a string within the vector and change its value.

std::string My_Namespace::My_Class::ask(std::string question, std::vector<std::string> *validInputs){
    bool val = false;
    std::string response;
    while(!val){
        //Ask and get a response
        response = ask(question);
        //Iterate through the acceptable responses looking for a match
        for(unsigned int i = 0; i < validInputs->size(); i++){
            if(response == validInputs->at(i)){
                ////1) Above condition always returns true/////
                val = true;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
//////////2) does not print anything//////////
println(validInputs->at(0)); //note the println method is just cout << param << "\n" << std::endl
//Really I want to manipulate its value (not the pointer the actual value)
//So I'd want something analogous to validInputs.set(index, newVal); from java
///////////////////////////////////////////
}

A few additional questions:

3) I'm using .at(index) on the the vector to get the value but I've read that [] should be used instead, however I'm not sure what that should look like (validInputs[i] doesn't compile).

4) I assume that since a deep copy is unnecessary its good practice to pass in a pointer to the vector as above, can someone verify that?

5) I've heard that ++i is better practice than i++ in loops, is that true? why?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

3) There should not be a significant difference using at and operator[] in this case. Note that you have a pointer-to-vector, not a vector (nor reference-to-vector) so you will have to use either (*validInputs)[i] or validInputs->operator[](i) to use the operator overload. Using validInputs->at(i) is fine if you don't want to use either of these other approaches. (The at method will throw an exception if the argument is out of the array bounds, while the operator[] method has undefined behavior when the argument is out of the array bounds. Since operator[] skips the bounds check, it is faster if you know for a fact that i is within the vector's bounds. If you are not sure, use at and be prepared to catch an exception.)

4) A pointer is good, but a reference would be better. And if you're not modifying the vector in the method, a reference-to-const-vector would be best (std::vector<std::string> const &). This ensures that you cannot be passed a null pointer (references cannot be null), while also ensuring that you don't accidentally modify the vector.

5) It usually is. i++ is post-increment, which means that the original value must be copied, then i is incremented and the copy of the original value is returned. ++i increments i and then returns i, so it is usually faster, especially when dealing with complex iterators. With an unsigned int the compiler should be smart enough to realize that a pre-increment will be fine, but it's good to get into the practice of using ++i if you don't need the original, unincremented value of i.

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No significant difference? One throws an exception, the other invokes undefined behavior... I'll call that significant –  K-ballo Jan 18 '13 at 19:56
    
@K-ballo It is significant in other situations; I was referring specifically to this one, where we know that i is within bounds. But I will edit my answer to include this difference. –  cdhowie Jan 18 '13 at 19:58
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I'd use a reference-to-const, and std::find. Note that I also take the string by reference (it gets deep copied otherwise) :

std::string My_Class::
ask (const std::string& question, const std::vector<std::string>& validInputs)
{
    for (;;) {
        auto response = ask (question);
        auto i = std::find (validInputs.begin (), validInputs.end (), response);

        if (i != validInputs.end ()) {
             std::cout << *i << '\n'; // Prints the value found
             return *i;
        }
    }
}

Read about iterators if you don't understand the code. Of course, feel free to ask other questions if you need.

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I'm not going to address points 1 and 2 since we don't know what you are doing and we don't even see the code for ask and println.

I'm using .at(index) on the the vector to get the value but I've read that [] should be used instead, however I'm not sure what that should look like (validInputs[i] doesn't compile).

Subscript access and at member function are different things. They give you the very same thing, a reference to the indexed element, but they behave differently if you pass an out-of bounds index: at will throw an exception while [] will invoke undefined behavior (as builtin arrays do). Using [] on a pointer is somewhat ugly, (*validInputs)[i], but you really should avoid pointers when possible.

I assume that since a deep copy is unnecessary its good practice to pass in a pointer to the vector as above, can someone verify that?

A deep copy is unnecessary, but so is a pointer. You want a reference instead, and a const one since I presume you shouldn't be modifying those:

ask(std::string const& question, std::vector<std::string> const& validInputs)

I've heard that ++i is better practice than i++ in loops, is that true? why?

Its true in the general case. The two operations are different, ++i increments i and returns the new value while i++ increments i but returns the value before the incrementation, which requires a temporary to be hold and returned. For ints this hardly matters, but for potentially fat iterators preincrement is more efficient and a better choice if you don't need or care for its return value.

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To answer questions 1 and 2, we'll probably need more information, like: How did you initialize validInputs? What's the source of ask?

3) First dereference the pointer, then index the vector:

(*validInputs)[i]

4) References are considered better style. Especially instead of pointers which never are NULL.

5) For integers, it doesn't matter (unless you evaluate the result of the expression). For other objects, with overloaded ++ operators (iterators, for example) it may be better to use ++i. But in practice, for inline definitions of the ++ operator, it will probably be optimized to the same code.

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