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I've got two validation functions for my usermodel

User.schema.path('email').validate(function(value, respond) {
  User.findOne({email: value}, function(err, user) {
    if(err) throw err;
    if(user) return respond(false);
    respond(true);
  });
}, 'EMAIL_EXISTS');

and the same for username

User.schema.path('username').validate(function(value, respond) {
  User.findOne({username: value}, function(err, user) {
    if(err) throw err;
    if(user) return respond(false);
    respond(true);
  });
}, 'USERNAME_TAKEN');

They return errors in the following format

{ message: 'Validation failed',
  name: 'ValidationError',
  errors: 
    { username: 
      { message: 'Validator "USERNAME_TAKEN" failed for path username',
        name: 'ValidatorError',
        path: 'username',
        type: 'USERNAME_TAKEN' } } }

The error for the email path is similar. Is there a smarter way to check for those errors than the following?

if (err && err.errors && err.errors.username) { ... }

This is kind of ugly.

share|improve this question
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Technically you must check first the error name because not all errors are handled the same way. Then, based on the error name you must check for particular properties, as the errors property that comes with a ValidationError.

Also you put the field name in the error type and this is redundant, it's better to use the same error type because in the error checking procedure you will get the field name also.

So your code can be something like:

User.schema.path('email').validate(function(value, respond) {
  User.findOne({email: value}, function(err, user) {
    if(err) throw err;
    if(user) return respond(false);
    respond(true);
  });
}, 'exists');

User.schema.path('username').validate(function(value, respond) {
  User.findOne({username: value}, function(err, user) {
    if(err) throw err;
    if(user) return respond(false);
    respond(true);
  });
}, 'exists');

And then, the error checking procedure:

if (err) {
  switch (err.name) {
    case 'ValidationError':
      for (field in err.errors) {
        switch (err.errors[field].type) {
          case 'exists':
            ...
            break;
          case 'invalid':
            ...
            break;
          ...
        }
      }
      break;
    default:
      ...
  }
}

If you want to shorten this, you have various options. If you only have one type of validation you can do it like this:

if (err) {
  if (err.name == 'ValidationError') {
    for (field in err.errors) {
      ...
    }
  } else {
    // A general error (db, crypto, etc…)
    ...
  }
}

The minimal expression of the error check procedure would be similar to what you've wrote in your post:

if (err) {
  for (field in err.errors) {
    ...
  }
}

This will work because if errors is not defined it will just ignore the for. But you're ignoring all other error types here.

I also think that these error layouts are a bit messing, but don't expect for this to change in a near future.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the hint regarding redundancy – zemirco Feb 21 '13 at 18:50
1  
ValidationError is generic error and is thrown by several other modules with each having different format and/or properties. Its better to be specific and check err instanceof mongoose.Error.ValidationError in your error checking procedure. – Kunal Kapadia Oct 14 '15 at 22:08

Just write the following code and enjoy.

if (err) {
    console.log('Error Inserting New Data');
    if (err.name == 'ValidationError') {
        for (field in err.errors) {
            console.log(err.errors[field].message); 
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not something you want everywhere across your code, but it would make a good helper function. – River Williamson Nov 25 '15 at 16:16

Why don't you use the validation method as described in the API?

objectToSave.validate(function(err) {          
  if (err) {
    // handle error
  }     
  else {
    // validation passed
  }
});
share|improve this answer
1  
This method is called pre save and if a validation rule is violated, save is aborted and the error is returned to your callback. So that's basically what I'm already doing. Problem I have is handling the err without too much hassle. – zemirco Feb 21 '13 at 18:45

I found this helpful which displays all errors in an array.

For example I submitted a form with short password and invalid email.

if (err && err.name === 'ValidationError') {
   err.toString().replace('ValidationError: ', '').split(',')
}

Which results in this

[ 'Please provide a valid email address',
'The password should be at least 6 characters long' ]

If you have a comma , in your error messages than try without .split(',')

No need for for loops. Make sure you have validation error messages in your schema. For the above example I have

const validateEmail = email => {
  const re = /^\w+([\.-]?\w+)*@\w+([\.-]?\w+)*(\.\w{2,3})+$/;
  return re.test(email);
};

const Schema = mongoose.Schema;
const userSchema = new Schema({
   ...
   email: {
      type: String,
      trim: true,
      required: 'Email address is required',
      validate: [validateEmail, 'Please provide a valid email address'],
   },
   password: { type: String, set: encryptPassword, maxlength: [6, 'The password should be at least {MAXLENGTH} characters long'] },
   ...
});
share|improve this answer

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