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How would you go about disabling, or at the very least changing, how Angular validates type=email inputs?

Currently, if you use type=email, Angular essentially double validates.. as the Browser (Chrome in this case) validates the email, and then angular does too. Not only that, but what is valid in Chrome foo@bar is not valid in Angularjs.

The best i could find, is ng-pattern, but ng-pattern simply adds a 3rd pattern validation for the input type.. instead of replacing Angular's email validation. heh

Any ideas?

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5 Answers 5

Note: This is example is for angular 1.2.0-rc.3. Things might behave differently on other versions

Like others have stated it is a bit complex to turn off angulars default input validation. You need to add your own directive to the input element and handle things in there. Sergey's answer is correct, however it presents some problems if you need several validators on the element and don't want the built in validator to fire.

Here is an example validating an email field with a required validator added. I have added comments to the code to explain what is going on.

Input element

<input type="email" required>

Directive

angular.module('myValidations', [])

.directive('input', function () {
  var self = {
      // we use ?ngModel since not all input elements 
      // specify a model, e.g. type="submit" 
      require: '?ngModel'
      // we need to set the priority higher than the base 0, otherwise the
      // built in directive will still be applied
    , priority: 1
      // restrict this directive to elements
    , restrict: 'E'
    , link: function (scope, element, attrs, controller) {
        // as stated above, a controller may not be present
        if (controller) {

          // in this case we only want to override the email validation
          if (attrs.type === 'email') {
            // clear this elements $parsers and $formatters
            // NOTE: this will disable *ALL* previously set parsers
            //       and validators for this element. Beware!
            controller.$parsers = [];
            controller.$formatters = [];

            // this function handles the actual validation
            // see angular docs on how to write custom validators
            // http://docs.angularjs.org/guide/forms
            //
            // in this example we are not going to actually validate an email
            // properly since the regex can be damn long, so apply your own rules
            var validateEmail = function (value) {
              console.log("Validating as email", value);
              if (controller.$isEmpty(value) || /@/.test(value)) {
                controller.$setValidity('email', true);
                return value;
              } else {
                controller.$setValidity('email', false);
                return undefined;
              }
            };

            // add the validator to the $parsers and $formatters
            controller.$parsers.push(validateEmail);
            controller.$formatters.push(validateEmail);
          }
        }
      }
  };
  return self;
})

// define our required directive. It is a pretty standard
// validation directive with the exception of it's priority.
// a similar approach must be take with all validation directives
// you would want to use alongside our `input` directive
.directive('required', function () {
  var self = {
      // required should always be applied to a model element
      require: 'ngModel'
    , restrict: 'A'
      // The priority needs to be higher than the `input` directive
      // above, or it will be removed when that directive is run
    , priority: 2
    , link: function (scope, element, attrs, controller) {
        var validateRequired = function (value) {
          if (value) {
            // it is valid
            controller.$setValidity('required', true);
            return value;
          } else {
            // it is invalid, return undefined (no model update)
            controller.$setValidity('required', false);
            return undefined;
          }

        };
        controller.$parsers.push(validateRequired);
      }
  };
  return self;
})
;

There you have it. You now have control over type="email" input validations. Please use a proper regex to test the email though.

One thing to note is that in this example validateEmail is run before validateRequired. If you need validateRequired to run before any other validations, then just prepend it to the $parsers array (using unshift instead of push).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info. It has promise but in my version of 1.2.0 RC 3, I get "Object [object Object] has no method '$isEmpty'". So, it is saying the controller has no method "$isEmpty". That doesn't make sense to me as the Angular source uses that method in its controllers too. Ideas? –  Justin Oct 25 '13 at 23:52
    
@Justin No, that does not really make sense. Make sure that the input field has a model on it (use the chrome batarang extension to check this). Without more information about your case i am afraid that i can't help any more. –  alterecco Oct 27 '13 at 19:43
    
Thanks for this. Verified that this works in 1.2.3, though not in 1.1.15. –  Joe McBride Dec 5 '13 at 6:52
    
Isn't this just really dangerous to do, especially in the middle of a project where there may already be developers who've set up custom validations, etc? –  nfiniteloop Jun 20 '14 at 18:31

On HTML5 you can use the form's attribute novalidate to disable browser's validation:

<form novalidate>
    <input type="email"/>
</form>

If you want to create a custom validator in angularjs, you have a good tutorial and example here: http://www.benlesh.com/2012/12/angular-js-custom-validation-via.html

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The problem is, the custom validator won't override Angulars default type=email validator, will it? –  Lee Olayvar Jan 19 '13 at 1:50
2  
Indeed, after examining the code, it appears Angular inserts its own validator--I didn't see a way at a glance to remove it. –  BinaryMuse Jan 19 '13 at 5:33
    
@LeeOlayvar It's possible to remove the default email validator but it's not easy. Why don't you use an <input type="text"> with your own custom email validator directive? This will automatically solve the problem with the browser's and angularjs default email validation. –  bmleite Jan 19 '13 at 18:35
7  
There is some advantages to use type="email" like on smartphones the keyboard switches to another mode so it's easier to type in your email –  jackdbernier Apr 26 '13 at 1:24
    
I am having the exact same problem, and got to this exact point in trying to solve it. I need the email keyboard to pop up, and don't want angularjs email validation. Did anyone ever get a good solution to this? –  Billy Moon Sep 19 '13 at 12:56

In my project I do something like this (custom directive the erases all other validations including ones installed by angularjs):

angular.module('my-project').directive('validEmail', function() {
    return {
        require: 'ngModel',
        link: function(scope, elm, attrs, ctrl){
            var validator = function(value){
                if (value == '' || typeof value == 'undefined') {
                    ctrl.$setValidity('validEmail', true);
                } else {
                    ctrl.$setValidity('validEmail', /your-regexp-here/.test(value));
                }
                return value;
            };

            // replace all other validators!
            ctrl.$parsers = [validator];
            ctrl.$formatters = [validator];
        }
    }
});

How to use it (note novalidate, it's required to turn off browser validation):

<form novalidate>
    <input type="email" model="email" class="form-control" valid-email>
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer this solution over the alterecco's solution –  nfiniteloop Jun 20 '14 at 18:32

Very simple. I had to alter the email regex to match a business requirement, so I made this directive that makes the email regex customizable. It essentially overwrites the original validator with my custom one. You don't have to mess with all the $parsers and $formatters (unless I'm missing something). So my directive was this...

module.directive('emailPattern', function(){
    return {
        require : 'ngModel',
        link : function(scope, element, attrs, ngModel) {

            var EMAIL_REGEX = new RegExp(attrs.emailPattern, "i");

            ngModel.$validators["email"] = function (modelValue, viewValue) {
                var value = modelValue || viewValue;
                return ngModel.$isEmpty(value) || EMAIL_REGEX.test(value);
            };
        }
    }
});

But if you just want to permanently disable it then you could do this.

module.directive('removeNgEmailValidation', function(){
    return {
        require : 'ngModel',
        link : function(scope, element, attrs, ngModel) {
            ngModel.$validators["email"] = function () {
                return true;
            };
        }
    }
});

Then use it like this...

<input type="email" remove-ng-email-validation>
share|improve this answer

Echoing nfiniteloop, you don't need to mess with the $parsers or $formatters to override the default validators. As referenced in the Angular 1.3 docs, the $validators object is accessible on the ngModelController. With custom directives you can write as many different email validation functions as you need and call them wherever you want.

Here's one with a very nice standard email format regex from tuts: 8 Regular Expressions You Should Now (probably identical to Angular's default, idk).

var app = angular.module('myApp', []);

app.directive('customEmailValidate', function() {
  return {
    require: 'ngModel',
    link: function(scope, elm, attrs, ctrl) {

      var EMAIL_REGEXP = /^([a-z0-9_\.-]+)@([\da-z\.-]+)\.([a-z\.]{2,6})$/;

      ctrl.$validators.email = function(modelValue, viewValue) {
        if (ctrl.$isEmpty(modelValue)) {
          // consider empty models to be valid
          return true;
        }

        if (EMAIL_REGEXP.test(viewValue)) {
          // it is valid
          return true;
        }

        // it is invalid
        return false;
      };
    } 
  };
});

Here's one that removes validation entirely:

var app = angular.module('myApp', []);

app.directive('noValidation', function() {
  return {
    require: 'ngModel',
    link: function(scope, elm, attrs, ctrl) {
      ctrl.$validators.email = function(modelValue, viewValue) {
        // everything is valid
        return true;
      };
    } 
  };
});

To use in your markup:

<!-- 'test@example.com' is valid, '@efe@eh.c' is invalid -->
<input type="email" custom-email-validate>

<!-- both 'test@example.com' and '@efe@eh.c' are valid -->
<input type="email" no-validation>
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