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I like to use const& type T = LongVariableName to relabel variables in a short segment of code, especially one that involves formulas.

For example:

const double& x = VectorNorm;
double y = a*x*x*x + b*x*x + c*x + d;

I figure the compiler should be smart enough to optimize these reference variables away. Will that almost always happen? When won't it?

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By the way, ((a * x + b) * x + c) * x + d is likely faster than your formula. –  FredOverflow Jan 18 '13 at 21:17
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Also, I would get rid of the reference and just write double x = VectorNorm; –  FredOverflow Jan 18 '13 at 21:17
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1 Answer 1

It is up to the compiler and the optimization options that you have set - there's no guarantee that it will or will not be optimized away. Modern compilers with optimizations enabled will likely optimize it away, but a better question is: should you care? Unless you're in a tight loop running thousands of times per second, don't worry about it. Code clarity is often more important than shaving off a few clock cycles.

But at any rate, let's take a look. I'm using gcc 4.7.2 via MinGW. We'll use this code:

so.cpp:

#include <cstdio>

int main()
{
    float aReallyLongNameForAVariable = 4.2;
#ifdef SHORT_REF
    const float& x = aReallyLongNameForAVariable;
    float bar = x * x * x;
#else
    float bar = aReallyLongNameForAVariable * aReallyLongNameForAVariable * aReallyLongNameForAVariable;
#endif
    printf("bar is %f\n", bar);
    return 0;
}

Without the "shorthand reference", we get the following assembly:

g++ -S -masm=intel -o noref.S so.cpp

call    ___main
mov eax, DWORD PTR LC0
mov DWORD PTR [esp+28], eax
fld DWORD PTR [esp+28]
fmul    DWORD PTR [esp+28]
fmul    DWORD PTR [esp+28]
fstp    DWORD PTR [esp+24]
fld DWORD PTR [esp+24]
fstp    QWORD PTR [esp+4]
mov DWORD PTR [esp], OFFSET FLAT:LC1
call    _printf
mov eax, 0
leave

Now let's use the reference:

g++ -DSHORT_REF -S -masm=intel -o ref.S so.cpp

call    ___main
mov eax, DWORD PTR LC0
mov DWORD PTR [esp+20], eax
lea eax, [esp+20]
mov DWORD PTR [esp+28], eax
mov eax, DWORD PTR [esp+28]
fld DWORD PTR [eax]
mov eax, DWORD PTR [esp+28]
fld DWORD PTR [eax]
fmulp   st(1), st
mov eax, DWORD PTR [esp+28]
fld DWORD PTR [eax]
fmulp   st(1), st
fstp    DWORD PTR [esp+24]
fld DWORD PTR [esp+24]
fstp    QWORD PTR [esp+4]
mov DWORD PTR [esp], OFFSET FLAT:LC1
call    _printf
mov eax, 0
leave

So it is a bit more assembly. But what happens when we turn on optimizations?

g++ -DSHORT_REF -O2 -S -masm=intel -o ref.S so.cpp
g++ -O2 -S -masm=intel -o noref.S so.cpp

Both generate the identical assembly:

call    ___main
fld DWORD PTR LC0
fstp    QWORD PTR [esp+4]
mov DWORD PTR [esp], OFFSET FLAT:LC1
call    _printf
xor eax, eax
leave

So there you have it. Modern compilers (gcc at least) optimize the reference away.

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