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I am trying to create an alias that will execute a script. When i cd into the directory where the script is located... lets say /usr/local/bin/startscript then the script runs as expected and starts the application i want it to.

SO. i went into my bashrc file and added an alias alias startscript='/usr/local/bin/startscript'

The goal is to be able to run the script by simply typing "startscript" from any directory.

However, when i try to use the alias to run the script, it does not work properly as the application that should start, does not.

My script starts with

#!/bin/sh

and then goes from there

any ideas? Thanks

SCRIPT:

#!/bin/sh

#- Check for user 'user'
if [[ "`whoami`" != "user" ]]; then
  echo "This script can only be executed by user 'user'."; exit
fi

. /usr/local/bin/etctrx/startscriptdirectory/startscriptsetup

#- Kill manager to avoid multiple processes
pkill -f 'JavaApp.jar'

#- Start
nohup java -classpath /usr/local/bin/etctrx/startscriptdirectory/RequiredJars/ojdbc5.jar:/usr/local/bin/etctrx/startscriptdirectory/RequiredJars/activation.jar:/usr/local/bin/etctrx/startscriptdirectory/RequiredJars/mail.jar -jar /usr/local/bin/etctrx/startscriptdirectory/JavaApp.jar > ${JAVAAPPLOGS}/startscript.log 2>&1 &
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2 Answers 2

If the script runs as expected while in /usr/local/bin by simply typing startscript, but from another directory the script runs (does not return an error), but doesn't produce the desired results, then the issue is with how you reference the application from within the script.

As others have noted, you shouldn't need an alias for something in /usr/local/bin and if it runs from that directory, obviously your executable permissions are correct too. If the application you're trying to run is also in /usr/local/bin then your script probably assumes it's in the same directory, which wouldn't be the case elsewhere, so you would need to either ad a cd to /usr/local/bin within the script or specify the full application path.

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So the java application that starts specifies the full path. and when i run the script from within the directory i type ./ I thought that when i tried running from different directory, i could just type /usr/local/etc to script without the dot and it has same effect? however, if i run the script without typing ./ it still gives me desired results(if run from directory where it lives) –  Dan Jan 18 '13 at 21:41
    
Try adding the cd /usr/local/bin within the script before the application call - if it's not the call itself that's failing, maybe the Java app is running, but has some dependency on the current directory that causes it to silently fail. If you could edit your post to show the line that calls the application, that could be helpful. –  David Ravetti Jan 18 '13 at 21:44

I am able to call the script if i do this, but it still won't give me the results I want,(application being started) like i do when I run the script from the directory it lives in

It would appear that the "application" in question is in the same directory as the script, /usr/local/bin, which we have established is already on your PATH. For the script to run correctly but not the application means you might be calling the application wrong, for example

./application

This would fail unless you were calling from /usr/local/bin. Fix would be like this

application
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I am able to call the script if i do this, but it still won't give me the results I want,(application being started) like i do when I run the script from the directory it lives in –  Dan Jan 18 '13 at 21:37
    
I have added the script, and I am a little confused by your answer change –  Dan Jan 18 '13 at 21:49

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