Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have made three "boxes" and each box contains a button. When I click the button, box hiding, when click again, box appears.

This is my html code:

<div id="SC1_A_"> <!-- BOX -->
<div id="SC1_B_" onClick="SC1();" class="something">&nbsp;</div> <!-- BUTTON -->
</div>
<div id="SC2_A_">
<div id="SC2_B_" onClick="SC2();" class="something">&nbsp;</div>
</div>
<div id="SC3_A_">
<div id="SC3_B_" onClick="SC3();" class="something">&nbsp;</div>
</div>

This is my javascript code:

<script type="text/javascript">    
function SC1(){

  var SC1_A = document.getElementById('SC1_A_);
  var SC1_B = document.getElementById('SC1_B_);

  if (SC1_A.style.display == 'block' || SC1_A.style.display == ''){
      SC1_A.className      = 'something';
      SC1_B.className      = 'something else';}   
else {SC1_A.className      = 'something else';
      SC1_B.className      = 'something';}
     }
     }
</script>

The example above works, but I have to make three similar scripts for each button. So I though to make something like this script below, using for loop. As you can imagine it didn't work. Any idea how can I make it work???

<script type="text/javascript">

for (i=1; i<10; i++){

function SCi(){

  var SCi_A = document.getElementById('SC'+i+'_A_');
  var SCi_B = document.getElementById('SC'+i+'_B_');

  if (SCi_A.style.display == 'block' || SCi_A.style.display == ''){
      SCi_A.className      = 'something';
      SCi_B.className      = 'something else';}   
else {SCi_A.className      = 'something else';
      SCi_B.className      = 'something';}
     }
     }
</script>

Please don't down-vote if you think question is too easy, but just give me your help here!!! Thank you in advance!!!

share|improve this question
    
There you go, much improved –  Gary Jan 19 '13 at 4:12
    
@Gary: It works now with George's example. It is closer on what my mind can understand. I can't get Lee's example!!! I can understand it's easy but for somehow I can't get it. Maybe cause I am not thinking like java's way... In other words, it is my fault lol. –  DNA180 Jan 19 '13 at 7:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're on the right track, you just need to learn the right syntax for what you are trying to express:

var SC = [];

First off, to have a lot of different functions, so instead of attempting to name them differently (which you were trying to do), we are going to just store each function in a different index in the SC array.

for (var i = 1; i < 10; i++) {
    SC[i] = (function () {
        var SC_A = document.getElementById('SC' + i + '_A_');
        var SC_B = document.getElementById('SC' + i + '_B_');

        return function () {
            if (SC_A.style.display === 'block' || SC_A.style.display === '') {
                SC_A.className = 'something';
                SC_B.className = 'something else';
            } else {
                SC_A.className = 'something else';
                SC_B.className = 'something';
            }
        }
    })();
}

Now, to call these functions you would do SC[1](), SC[2](), ... So you can either put that in each onclick in your HTML, or you could bind the events from the javascript.


Edit: I forgot to mention this because it isn't directly related to the syntax of the code, but the calls to 'document.getElementByIdwill not work until the document is fully loaded. So if you just put the script directly between to` tags it won't work. You have two choices. You either can keep the current code, but run it when the page loads. Or, you could restructure the code like this:

var SC = [];
for (var i = 1; i < 10; i++) {
    SC[i] = (function (i) {
        return function () {
            var SC_A = document.getElementById('SC' + i + '_A_');
            var SC_B = document.getElementById('SC' + i + '_B_');

            if (SC_A.style.display === 'block' || SC_A.style.display === '') {
                SC_A.className = 'something';
                SC_B.className = 'something else';
            } else {
                SC_A.className = 'something else';
                SC_B.className = 'something';
            }
        }
    })(i);
}

What's happening here is you are calling document.getElementById every time the button is clicked, instead of just once when the function is created. Slightly less efficient, but it works.

share|improve this answer
    
Since 'i' is defined outside the function body, would the function use the value of 'i' at the time of the call as opposed to the value of 'i' at the time the function is defined? –  Lee Meador Jan 18 '13 at 21:41
1  
@LeeMeador, moving i into the closure is unnecessary in this case because it is not used in the function that ends up being assigned to SC[i]. The function that is returned from the self-evaluating function only uses SC_A and SC_B, which are properly scoped by the self-evaluating function. –  George P Jan 18 '13 at 21:47
    
Why wouldn't you just define the function once and pass the value of i as an argument? –  natlee75 Jan 18 '13 at 21:59
    
@natlee75 You could do away with all of the copies of the function and simply pass in i as a parameter, similar to how Lee Meador did in his answer. My answer is just closer to the OP's original idea. –  George P Jan 18 '13 at 22:06
    
It works!!! Thank you very much my friend George!!! :) –  DNA180 Jan 19 '13 at 7:42

You define each section on the page as calling the one function and passing in the name of the other .

<div id="SC1_A_"> <!-- BOX -->
<div id="SC1_B_" onClick="SC('SC1_A_');" class="something">&nbsp;</div> <!-- BUTTON -->
</div>
<div id="SC2_A_">
<div id="SC2_B_" onClick="SC('SC2_A_');" class="something">&nbsp;</div>
</div>
<div id="SC3_A_">
<div id="SC3_B_" onClick="SC('SC3_A_');" class="something">&nbsp;</div>
</div>

There is just one function used for all of them

function SC(nameOfA){

   var SCi_A = document.getElementById(nameOfA);
   var SCi_B = this;

   if (SCi_A.style.display == 'block' || SCi_A.style.display == ''){
       SCi_A.className      = 'something';
       SCi_B.className      = 'something else';
   } else {
       SCi_A.className      = 'something else';
       SCi_B.className      = 'something';}
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am not saying your example is wrong, I just can't get it!!! Would you like to make it more detailed? I am talking about the first part! Thank you for your answer!!! –  DNA180 Jan 19 '13 at 7:41

here you can use this function on every click:

    <div id="SC1_A_"> <!-- BOX -->
         <div id="SC1_B_" onClick="SC(event)" class="something">&nbsp;</div> <!-- BUTTON -->
    </div>
<script type="text/javascript">
    function SC(event){
        var SCA = event.currentTarget.parentNode;
        var SCB = event.currentTarget;

        ................
    }
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
I can't understand this example :( –  DNA180 Jan 18 '13 at 22:45

Your code is defining a function named SCi 8 times. I think if you swap the first two lines you will get what you want.

share|improve this answer

You're redefining the same function (function SCi) eight times. The only version of the function that is retained is the version that's defined last. Going by your code, you're only creating a function that can work with the 8th box.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.