Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following is cute little template that I use often. Simply tells me if the given element is a member of a collection (which itself must be compatible with the find_if template):

// returns true if a given collection contains the given element
// NOTE: This is NOT optimized for associative containers!
template <typename ELEMENT, typename COLLECTION, typename PREDICATE>
bool contains(const COLLECTION & collection, ELEMENT element, PREDICATE predicate)
{
    return collection.end() != std::find_if(collection.begin(), collection.end(), boost::bind(predicate, element, _1));
}

I'm finding that VC2012 balks if I try to use a lambda as the predicate:

if (!contains(specs, str, [] (CString pathname, CString pattern) { return AsBool(PathMatchSpec(pathname, pattern)); }))
    continue;

VS2012SP1 spits out the following for the above context:

1>c:\users\steve\projects\cimex cad-cam\15.0\3rd party\boost\boost\bind\bind.hpp(69): error C2039: 'result_type' : is not a member of 'CMacroInterpreter::GetDirectoryOf::<lambda_60eac39ee69a5bdc77e08d06d79ae4c4>'
1>          c:\users\steve\projects\cimex cad-cam\15.0\cimex application\cimcad\macro directory.cpp(166) : see declaration of 'CMacroInterpreter::GetDirectoryOf::<lambda_60eac39ee69a5bdc77e08d06d79ae4c4>'
1>          c:\users\steve\projects\cimex cad-cam\15.0\3rd party\boost\boost\bind\bind_template.hpp(15) : see reference to class template instantiation 'boost::_bi::result_traits<R,F>' being compiled
1>          with
1>          [
1>              R=boost::_bi::unspecified,
1>              F=CMacroInterpreter::GetDirectoryOf::<lambda_60eac39ee69a5bdc77e08d06d79ae4c4>
1>          ]
1>          c:\users\steve\projects\cimex cad-cam\15.0\mfc toolbox\miscellaneous.h(360) : see reference to class template instantiation 'boost::_bi::bind_t<R,F,L>' being compiled
1>          with
1>          [
1>              R=boost::_bi::unspecified,
1>              F=CMacroInterpreter::GetDirectoryOf::<lambda_60eac39ee69a5bdc77e08d06d79ae4c4>,
1>              L=boost::_bi::list2<boost::_bi::value<CString>,boost::arg<1>>
1>          ]
1>          c:\users\steve\projects\cimex cad-cam\15.0\cimex application\cimcad\macro directory.cpp(166) : see reference to function template instantiation 'bool contains<CString,substring_container_adapter,CMacroInterpreter::GetDirectoryOf::<lambda_60eac39ee69a5bdc77e08d06d79ae4c4>>(const COLLECTION &,ELEMENT,PREDICATE)' being compiled
1>          with
1>          [
1>              COLLECTION=substring_container_adapter,
1>              ELEMENT=CString,
1>              PREDICATE=CMacroInterpreter::GetDirectoryOf::<lambda_60eac39ee69a5bdc77e08d06d79ae4c4>
1>          ]

I'm unclear on how to coerce things to accept the predicate lambda. Seems that boost is unable to deduce the return type of the lambda. And I'm unclear on what I can do to fix that?

I could define a local std::binary_function derivative functor. Just seems like it would be better to fix contains<> to allow it to handle lambdas directly.

share|improve this question
    
I thought we have all agreed that all uppercase names where reserved for macros... –  K-ballo Jan 18 '13 at 21:51
1  
Erm... so <T> is not a valid template identifier? lol –  Mordachai Jan 18 '13 at 21:56
1  
...you just blow my mind, sir. That said, we have seen templated code break out in the real world because some dummy physics library decided to declare macros like T... –  K-ballo Jan 18 '13 at 21:58
    
What boost header are you using? –  0x499602D2 Jan 18 '13 at 22:04
    
@K-ballo Yeah, I agree with you in principle - the all caps names are dangerous and ugly. This is one of my earlier templates, and I was still trying to find a style I liked. –  Mordachai Jan 18 '13 at 22:17
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It seems to be an issue with boost::bind. Using std::bind instead, your code builds fine with lambdas in VS2012:

#include <functional>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

template <typename ELEMENT, typename COLLECTION, typename PREDICATE>
bool contains(const COLLECTION & collection, ELEMENT element, PREDICATE predicate)
{
    return collection.end() != std::find_if(collection.begin(), collection.end(), std::bind(predicate, element, std::placeholders::_1));
}

std::vector<int> a;

int main()
{
    a.push_back(1);
    a.push_back(2);
    a.push_back(3);
    a.push_back(42);
    bool c = contains(a, 42, [](int a, int b) { return a == b; });
    return 0;
}

The same code builds just fine with g++ as well.

share|improve this answer
    
What boost header do I have to include to use this code? –  0x499602D2 Jan 18 '13 at 22:03
    
The code I posted doesn't require boost. std::bind, which is essentially the same as boost::bind, is in the C++11 standard. It can be used by including the functional header. –  Matt Kline Jan 18 '13 at 22:05
add comment

You could always try using another lambda:

template <typename ELEMENT, typename COLLECTION, typename PREDICATE>
bool contains(const COLLECTION & collection, ELEMENT element, PREDICATE predicate)
{
    typedef typename COLLECTION::value_type VALUE;

    return collection.end() != std::find_if(collection.begin(), collection.end(),
      [&]( VALUE const & e ){ return predicate( element, e ); });
}
share|improve this answer
    
What happened to _1? –  0x499602D2 Jan 18 '13 at 22:08
    
Interesting idea. Thanks. –  Mordachai Jan 18 '13 at 22:19
    
@David _1 represents the first argument to the call on function operator of the object produced by bind. In the case of std::find_if this is the element from the container being evaluated. So bind( predicate, element, _1 ) produces a unary function object which is equivalent to calling predicate( element, _1 ). The lambda expression in my answer does the same thing, no library required. –  Andrew Durward Jan 18 '13 at 22:19
    
David - the _1 isn't being used here because the second lambda is being handed what is effectively _1 (here called argument e). And the the bind is gone, because the extra lambda does the binding by copy by referencing 'element'. –  Mordachai Jan 18 '13 at 22:21
1  
@Mordachai You're right, I assumed you wanted to compare apples to apples. See edit for new "fruit salad" version. –  Andrew Durward Jan 18 '13 at 22:33
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.