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I have some trouble using apache cassandra. I have been trying to solve this problem for several weeks now.

This is my setup. I have 2 computers running apache cassandra(lets call the computer C1 and Computer C2), I create a keyspace with replication factor 2. This is so that each computer has a local copy of the data.

I have a program that reads a fairly large amount of data say about 500MB.

Scenario 1) Say only computer C1 has cassandra is running, I run the read program on computer C1 then this read occurs with half a minute to a minute.

Scenario 2) I now start the cassandra instance on the computer C2 and run the read program on computer C1 again- it now takes a very long time to complete in the order of 20 minutes.

I am not sure why this is happening. The read consistency is set to "One"

Expected performance

Ideally the read program on both computers C1 and C2 has to complete fast. This should be possible as both computers have a local copy of the data.

Can anyone please point me in the right direction? I really appreciate the help, Thanks

Update: Network Usage

This may not mean much, but I monitored the internet connection using nethogs and when both cassandra nodes are up, and I read the database, bandwidth is used by cassandra to communicate with the other node - presumably this is read repairs occuring in the background as I've used the read consistency level 'One' and in my case the closest node with the required data is the local computer's cassandra instance (all nodes have all the data) - so the source of data should be from the local computer...

Update: SQLTransentExceptions: TimedOutException()

When both nodes are up, the program that reads the database, however, has several SQLTransentExceptions: TimedOutException(). I use the default timeout of 10 sec. But that raises a question of why the SQL statements are timing out, when all data retrieval should be from the local instance. Also, the same SQL code runs fine, if only one node is up.

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what client are using? cassandra-cli (default CL.ONE)? – Schildmeijer Jan 18 '13 at 22:28
    
show me the output from "nodetool -h localhost ring" (running from either C1 or C2, when both are up and running) – Schildmeijer Jan 18 '13 at 22:29
    
Thanks a lot for your response. I am actually using a cassandra jdbc connector library from a java program i wrote to read the data. I've updated the original post with the nodetool ring output... It seems to show only C2 up, despite both C1 and C2 running normally.. – Sparrow Jan 19 '13 at 15:26
    
Some information that would help: 1. Do a ping from one node to the other to see what your network latency is. 2. Look at the logs to see what Cassandra is doing. 3. Does your client library discover nodes and round-robin your requests? – rs_atl Jan 20 '13 at 13:50
    
Thanks for your response. 1) The latency is around 20ms give or take. 2) I've checked the cassandra logs, no errors of any kind. The program that reads the database, however, has several SQLTransientExceptions: TimedOutException(). I use the default timeout of 10 sec. But that raises a question of why the SQL statements are timing out, when all data retrieval should be from the local instance. Also, the same SQL code runs fine, if only one node is up. – Sparrow Jan 20 '13 at 15:51

There is no such thing as a read consistency of "ANY" (that only applies to writes). The lowest read consistency is ONE. You need to check what your read consistency really is.

Perhaps your configuration is setup in such a way that a read requires data from both servers to be fetched (if both are up), and fetching data from C2 to C1 is really slow.

Force set your read consistency level to "ONE".

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Thanks a lot for your response! I had actually meant read consistency of one... I tested it after explicitly setting the consistency and it still shows the same problem. Also the consistency alone wouldn't explain the scenario in the further details section of the original post. Please let me know if you have further suggestions. – Sparrow Jan 19 '13 at 1:13

You appear to have a token collision, which in your case translates to both nodes owning 100% of the keys. What you need to do is reassign one of the nodes such that it owns half the tokens. Use nodetool move (use token 85070591730234615865843651857942052864) followed by nodetool cleanup.

The slow speeds most likely are from the high network latency, which when multiplied across all your transactions (with some subset actually timing out) result in a correspondingly large job time. Many client libraries use auto node discovery to learn about new or downed nodes, then round robin requests across available nodes. So even though you're only telling it about localhost, it's probably learning about the other node on its own.

In any distributed computing environment where nodes must communicate, network latency and reliability are a huge factor and must be dealt with.

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Thanks a lot for your response. A token collision was definitely part of the problem. I've fixed the token collision problem now, however the Scenario 1 and 2 described in the original post still occur.Would you have any further insight in this? I've will update the original post with the details now. – Sparrow Jan 20 '13 at 4:33
    
Oh, cool I've definitely learnt something new here. This could definitely be the issue. I am using the Cassandra CQL JDBC connector. I've have searched far and wide but I cannot figure out if there is auto node discovery built into this library. Would you know if the CQL JDBC connector has auto node discovery and how I may be able to turn this off? I can see that high level client libraries like Hector have these built in, however it is very unclear for the case of the CQL JDBC connector. – Sparrow Jan 21 '13 at 14:48

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