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struct anup1 {
    int a;
};
void structpass_1(struct anup1 b) // accepting structure
{
    cout << b.a;
};
void structpass_2(struct anup1& b) // accepting address of a structure
{
    cout << b.a;
};

int main() {
    struct anup1 a2;
    a2.a = 100;
    structpass_1(a2);
    structpass_2(a2);
}

The above code gives same output...whether accepting parameter is struct / address of struct.

Can anyone please explain to me this behavior?

Thanks

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1  
what did you expect that was different –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 18 '13 at 22:18
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In structpass_1 your structure anup1 is passed by value, so a local copy is done and passed to the function.

Instead, in structpass_2 the structure is passed by reference, i.e. a pointer to the structure instance is passed to the function (you have pointer semantic but value syntax). No local copy of the whole structure is done.

Note that for a simple structure containing only one integer passing by value or by reference is the same from a performance perspective. But when you have more complex (and bigger) data, passing by reference is more efficient.

An important difference between the two cases of passing by value vs. passing by reference is that if you modify the structure instance inside the function body, only if the structure is passed by reference the modifications are persistent at the call site. Instead, when you pass the structure by value, since a local copy is done inside the function body, the modifications are lost when the function exits. e.g.:

void structpass_1(anup1 b) // pass by value
{
    cout << b.a << '\n';
    b.a++; // modification lost at the call site
};

void structpass_2(anup1& b) // pass by reference
{
    cout << b.a << '\n';
    b.a++; // the caller will see the incremented value for b.a
};

int main() 
{
    anup1 a2;
    a2.a = 100;
    structpass_1(a2); // will print 100
    structpass_2(a2); // will print 100
    cout << a2.a; // willl print 101 (structure modified by structpass_2)
}
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It passes a reference to struct anup1 to the function.

void structpass_2( struct anup1 &b)

Have a look about what is reference: reference

Also keyword struct is not necessary in function parameter list, you can write:

void structpass_1(anup1 b) // accepting structure
void structpass_2(const anup1& b) // accepting address of a structure

Add const qulifier to parameter if it's readonly

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks all! I was missing the following concept. For C programming language..to pass as reference we need to pass the address of the variables...But in C++ we have "Reference variables" which are declared as int &ref = a; So in the above example I was passing just variable in first case and a "reference variable" in second case....Anyways thanks for your guidance and time..I really appreciate.. –  anup.stackoverflow Jan 18 '13 at 22:46
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void structpass_2( struct anup1 &b)

This is taking a reference. A pointer would be with a *.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks all! I was missing the following concept. For C programming language..to pass as reference we need to pass the address of the variables...But in C++ we have "Reference variables" which are declared as int &ref = a; So in the above example I was passing just variable in first case and a "reference variable" in second case....Anyways thanks for your guidance and time..I really appreciate.. –  anup.stackoverflow Jan 18 '13 at 22:46
add comment

The second function

void structpass_2( struct anup1 &b)

in C++ syntax is pass by reference, pass by reference will simply pass the address of the object into the function.

While the first function

void structpass_1(struct anup1 b)

uses pass by value. It will first make a copy of struct a, then pass to the function. Pass by reference is more efficient.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks all! I was missing the following concept. For C programming language..to pass as reference we need to pass the address of the variables...But in C++ we have "Reference variables" which are declared as int &ref = a; So in the above example I was passing just variable in first case and a "reference variable" in second case....Anyways thanks for your guidance and time..I really appreciate.. –  anup.stackoverflow Jan 18 '13 at 22:44
add comment

These functions are equivalent for a programmer, the only difference they make is in the underlying machine code - the first one operates on a copy (an object), the second one operates on the original object via a reference (so really a pointer).

The output you get is 100% correct.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks all! I was missing the following concept. For C programming language..to pass as reference we need to pass the address of the variables...But in C++ we have "Reference variables" which are declared as int &ref = a; So in the above example I was passing just variable in first case and a "reference variable" in second case....Anyways thanks for your guidance and time..I really appreciate.. –  anup.stackoverflow Jan 18 '13 at 22:45
add comment

Simply, the first one creates an exact copy of the object. This is useful for optimizing code but remember to use const if you do not want to modify the original object.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks all! I was missing the following concept. For C programming language..to pass as reference we need to pass the address of the variables...But in C++ we have "Reference variables" which are declared as int &ref = a; So in the above example I was passing just variable in first case and a "reference variable" in second case....Anyways thanks for your guidance and time..I really appreciate.. –  anup.stackoverflow Jan 18 '13 at 22:54
add comment

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