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I'm making a library which will perform operations to read a processes memory, and get information from said process.

The problem I have is that to call the functions, I have to pass a lot of the variables every time, even if their values haven't changed.

For instance, ReadProcessMemory requires me to pass:

  • Process Handle
  • Memory Address
  • Main Module Base Address
  • Amount of bytes to read

The only thing that will be changing for each read is the Memory Address, so I don't really need to pass the rest of the variables every time I call the function (I actually have 3 functions which can be reduced in this way, and may have more shortly).

Could anyone give me a brief explanation as to how I should go about this? Will the variables exist at runtime so I can just call the function and use them directly from the DLL file?

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I don't understand the problem; just put all the values into place in the function call and provide a variable for the memory address. –  KevinDTimm Jan 18 '13 at 23:15
    
Can you just remove them as arguments to your function or use default arguments? –  Shane Andrade Jan 18 '13 at 23:16
    
Note too that ProcessHandle is going to be different for every call (you don't really think that it's going to called from only one program, do you?). –  KevinDTimm Jan 18 '13 at 23:17
    
Basically my DLL does this: –  XtrmJosh Jan 18 '13 at 23:17
    
Aff, accidentally pressed enter. Let me explain, the Handle will change, as will the BaseAddress, so I must grab these when my program starts, the quantity of bytes to read will also vary depending on which address I'm passing in... I don't mind passing the quantity of bytes or the main Address, but the base and window handle are a bit excessive when I'm calling the function 30 times or more every minute, and on over 100 occasions in my code... –  XtrmJosh Jan 18 '13 at 23:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use named parameters when calling methods with optional parameters.

public void MyMethod(string s = null, int i = 0, MyType t = null)
{ 
    /* body */ 
}

Call it like so:

MyMethod(i: 10, t: new MyType());
MyMethod("abc");
MyMethod("abc", t: new MyType());

Alternatively you could use overloads:

public void MyMethod(string s)
{
    MyMethod(s, 0, null);
}
public void MyMethod(int i)
{
    MyMethod(null, i, null);
}
public void MyMethod(MyType t)
{
    MyMethod(null, 0, t);
}
public void MyMethod(string s = null, int i = 0, MyType t = null)
{ 
    /* body */ 
}

Yet another option is to use a parameters class like so:

public class MyParametersClass
{
    public string s { get; set; }
    public int i { get; set; }
    public MyType t { get;set; }

    public MyParametersClass()
    {
        // set defaults
        s = null;
        i = 0;
        MyType = null;
    }
}

public void MyMethod(MyParametersClass c)
{ 
    /* body */ 
}

Calling like so:

MyMethod(new MyParametersClass 
{
    i = 25,
    t = new MyType()
});

Using the parameters class is likely your preferred approach. The parameters class can be carried around as you process whatever you're processing. :) Any changes made to it will not be lost...

var parameters = new MyParametersClass();
MyMethod(parameters);
parameters.i = 26;
MyMethod(parameters);
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That's almost what I'm looking for, but the variables which I don't want to pass will be set on startup, meaning they won't be the same each time the program is run. Sorry for misleading you, and thanks for your response! –  XtrmJosh Jan 18 '13 at 23:19
    
The {get; set;} stuff will allow me to modify a "global variable" in a library? That looks to be just what I'm looking for, if so! Thanks! –  XtrmJosh Jan 18 '13 at 23:24
    
var doesn't seem to exist for some reason? In your post it's syntax highlighted, but in VS it won't! Ugh! Was this removed in 5.0 or something? –  XtrmJosh Jan 18 '13 at 23:27
    
Change var to MyParametersClass –  flem Jan 18 '13 at 23:29
    
Gotcha, that worked. Massive thanks, it appears this should work, just testing now. –  XtrmJosh Jan 18 '13 at 23:32

One approach is to convert method call into object and have arguments cached in such object. Called refactoring to "method object".

Approximate sample (Tx - are some types):

 int My.ReadProcessMemory(T1 a1, T2 a2, T3 variable)
 {...}


 class ReadProcessMemory
 {
      T1 a1;
      T2 a2;
      public ReadProcessMemory(T1 a1, T2 a2)
      {
         this.a1 = a1;
         this.a2 = a2;
      }
      public int Run(T3 variable)
      {
         return My.ReadProcessMemory(a1, a2, variable);
      }
 }
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This looks like a likely answer and will investigate it now, thanks. –  XtrmJosh Jan 18 '13 at 23:20
    
@XtrmJosh, I've added sample how one can go about this refactoring in your case when some parameters change and some are not. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 18 '13 at 23:24
    
Not entirely following this solution and another has worked. Thank you for your input, and I'm going to look into refactoring for the sake of learning more. Cheers (Y) –  XtrmJosh Jan 19 '13 at 0:38

Write a wrapper class for this ... set up the variable as properties or parms for the "new thing(...)" then subsequent calls are thing.Read(MemoryAddress)

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In addition to using named parameters you will need to store the values that don't change in your library somehow.

If these are just runtime variables then you can just use class variables (if your library is a class) or static variables (if not). This does however, mean that your library is storing the state of the system and must verify that the state is still valid on every call.

Requiring the values to be passed in each call is actually a much cleaner interface and forces the users of your library to work in a consistent manner.

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