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In a custom control there is this repeat control that refers to a column in a folder (not a view). The folder's default design can be changed in time, in combination with the custom control. So it could happen that the code of the custom control is newer than the design of the folder, and hence the design doesn't match and the XPage errors out.

What I specifically want is that the custom control handles errors related to a missing view/folder column or similar design errors. The error is to be reported somewhere, informing the user that he/she can activate something that will repair the situation.

I know how to trap JavaScript errors, unfortunately all column values are in Expression Language. I could recode them, of course, but I'd like to know if there's a better way.

In short: how can I trap Expression Language errors?

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2 Answers 2

You can trap EL language errors by adding your own VariableResolverand your own PropertyResolver. To do this, you have to create two Java classes:

  1. The Variable resolver

    package ch.hasselba.xpages.demo;
    
    import javax.faces.application.FacesMessage;
    import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
    import javax.faces.el.EvaluationException;
    import javax.faces.el.VariableResolver;
    
    public class ELErrVariableResolver extends VariableResolver {
    
      private final VariableResolver delegate;
    
      public ELErrVariableResolver(VariableResolver resolver) {
        delegate = resolver;
      }
    
      @Override
      public Object resolveVariable(FacesContext context, String name) throws EvaluationException {
          Object variable = null;
          try{
              variable = delegate.resolveVariable(context, name);
          }catch( EvaluationException ee ){
              addResolveErrMessage( context, name );
          }
    
         return variable;
      }
    
      public void addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext context , String name ){
          FacesMessage msg = new FacesMessage();
          msg.setSummary( "BAD EL! Variable '" + name + "' not found." );
          msg.setSeverity( FacesMessage.SEVERITY_FATAL );
          context.addMessage("BAD EL!", msg);
      }
    }
    
  2. The Property resolver

    package ch.hasselba.xpages.demo;
    
    import javax.faces.application.FacesMessage;
    import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
    import javax.faces.el.EvaluationException;
    import javax.faces.el.PropertyNotFoundException;
    import javax.faces.el.PropertyResolver;
    
    public class ELErrPropertyResolver extends PropertyResolver{
    
        private final PropertyResolver delegate;
    
          public ELErrPropertyResolver(PropertyResolver resolver) {
            delegate = resolver;
          }
    
    
        @Override
        public Class getType(Object paramObject1, Object paramObject2)
                throws EvaluationException, PropertyNotFoundException {
            Class c = null;
            try{
                c = delegate.getType(paramObject1, paramObject2);
            }catch(Exception e){
                addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(), paramObject1.toString() + "." + paramObject2.toString() );
            }
            return c;
        }
    
        @Override
        public Class getType(Object paramObject, int paramInt)
                throws EvaluationException, PropertyNotFoundException {
            Class c = null;
            try{
                c = delegate.getType(paramObject, paramInt);
            }catch(Exception e){
                addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(), paramObject.toString() + "." + paramInt );
            }
            return c;
        }
    
        @Override
        public Object getValue(Object paramObject1, Object paramObject2)
                throws EvaluationException, PropertyNotFoundException {
            Object c = null;
    
            try{
                c = delegate.getValue(paramObject1, paramObject2);
            }catch(Exception e){
                addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(), paramObject1.toString() + "."  + paramObject2.toString() );
            }
            return c;
        }
    
        @Override
        public Object getValue(Object paramObject, int paramInt)
                throws EvaluationException, PropertyNotFoundException {
            Object c = null;
            try{
                c = delegate.getValue(paramObject, paramInt);
            }catch(Exception e){
                addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(), paramObject.toString() + "." + paramInt );
            }
            return c;
        }
    
        @Override
        public boolean isReadOnly(Object paramObject1, Object paramObject2)
                throws EvaluationException, PropertyNotFoundException {
            boolean c = false;
            try{
                c = delegate.isReadOnly(paramObject1, paramObject2);
            }catch(Exception e){
                addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(), paramObject1.toString() + "." + paramObject2.toString() );
            }
            return c;
        }
    
        @Override
        public boolean isReadOnly(Object paramObject, int paramInt)
                throws EvaluationException, PropertyNotFoundException {
            boolean c = false;
            try{
                c = delegate.isReadOnly(paramObject, paramInt);
            }catch(Exception e){
                addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(), paramObject.toString() + "." + paramInt );
            }
            return c;
        }
    
        @Override
        public void setValue(Object paramObject1, Object paramObject2,
                Object paramObject3) throws EvaluationException,
                PropertyNotFoundException {
            try{
                delegate.setValue(paramObject1, paramObject2, paramObject3);
            }catch(Exception e){
                addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(), paramObject1.toString() + "." + paramObject2.toString() );
            }
    
        }
    
        @Override
        public void setValue(Object paramObject1, int paramInt, Object paramObject2)
                throws EvaluationException, PropertyNotFoundException {
    
            try{
                delegate.setValue(paramObject1, paramInt, paramObject2);
            }catch(Exception e){
                addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext.getCurrentInstance(), paramObject1.toString() + "." + paramInt );
            }
    
        }
    
        public void addResolveErrMessage( FacesContext context , String name ){
              FacesMessage msg = new FacesMessage();
              msg.setSummary( "BAD EL! Property '" + name + "' not found." );
              msg.setSeverity( FacesMessage.SEVERITY_FATAL );
              context.addMessage("BAD EL!", msg);
          }
    }
    
  3. Add the new resolvers to your faces-config.xml:

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    <faces-config>
       <application>
            <variable-resolver>ch.hasselba.xpages.demo.ELErrVariableResolver
            </variable-resolver>
            <property-resolver>ch.hasselba.xpages.demo.ELErrPropertyResolver
            </property-resolver>
        </application>
    </faces-config>
    
  4. On your CC add a xp:messages component to display your message (or change the error routine in the classes to add whatever you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Eh... wow... I do have to read and test that, soon I hope. Unfortunately, I have some personal matter I have to deal with first, so I don't have any idea when I find the time. –  D.Bugger Jan 21 '13 at 22:56
    
Just another question: does that also deal with view design errors, the ones that should be caught during the BeforePageLoad event? –  D.Bugger Jan 21 '13 at 22:58
    
This code traps EL errors only. But if an error occurs, you could then check the design of the folder / CC in the addResolveErrMessage method. Then you won't have problems with performance. –  Sven Hasselbach Jan 23 '13 at 9:10

In the custom control you can check if the folder/view you are going to work with is correct. Aka has the correct design. This can be done in the beforepageload event. When the design check reports an error it should be written to a log file and a 'nice' message should be displayed to the user.

The error logging could be done with the various logging projects on openntf like xlogger When your code reports an error you can than set a scoped value called 'displayRepeat' to false. The repeat control ( and other controls ) should be rendered according to this displayRepeat value.

To display the nice error message to the user. Place a errors control on the top of your control and add the following code:

facesContext.addMessage( null, 
new javax.faces.application.FacesMessage( "your error message" ) );
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply, but I think it's not a 'real' answer to my question: how to trap errors. I don't intend to check every folder's design when we have an upgrade of the design of the default folder. What I'm looking for is catching (design) errors inside a custom control (caused by Expression Language). –  D.Bugger Jan 19 '13 at 10:46
    
If you define 'design' errors as 'An error that occurs because the datasource is not compliant to what the custom control expects' I would say above answer is valid. Since the design can not be displayed because the datasource is invalid. But I dont know for sure if the el would throw an error even if the control is being hidden. ( it is stil loaded but not shown ) –  jjtbsomhorst Jan 19 '13 at 12:34
1  
I don't think your ansver is usable. To check for design every time you open control/page would kill performance (to check design is very expensive operation). One could make validity tests instead of design check (let's say to access every required column in try/catched script), but you would get just another problem - to synchronize view design changes with both - repeat design and testcase. –  Frantisek Kossuth Jan 19 '13 at 20:29

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