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How do I express multiple or options in a conditional statement in Ruby? I thought something like this would work but it doesn't:

1 == (3 || 2 || 1)
(1 == (3 || 2 || 1))

I thought those would return true.

I want a way to say if any number of a group of things are true then return true. Do I have to spell it out the long way?

if (1 == 3 || 1 == 2 || 1 == 1)

In English I would say it

If 1 equals 3, 2, or 1, then return true.

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1  
Maybe something like [3,2,1].include?(1) –  christianblais Jan 18 '13 at 23:44
    
I want it to be exactly equal to. –  Zach Jan 18 '13 at 23:46
    
.include? returns true if one of the object == anObject, it is as exact as your example could be. –  christianblais Jan 18 '13 at 23:49
    
What if I changed to Strings "dog", "dog toys", "big dog toys". And my string that I was comparing it to was "big dog". In my scenario I would want it to return false, but I think it would return true. –  Zach Jan 18 '13 at 23:56
2  
No, it wouldn't return true. –  christianblais Jan 19 '13 at 0:02
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, that's one way to do it. More Rubyesque would be:

if [3, 2, 1].include?(1)

The reason that 1 == (3 || 2 || 1) doesn't work is because (3 || 2 || 1) is evaluated first. The || operator returns the first value if it's truthy, and the second if the first is falsy.

Thus (3 || 2 || 1) is 3, so you're comparing 1 == 3, which is obviously false.

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Actually, 3 || 2 || 1 returns 3, not true - the resulting comparison is 1 == 3 which is even more obviously false! –  Andy H Jan 22 '13 at 15:20
    
Wow, wonder how I got 4 upvotes and a green check with such a glaring error. Fixed now. –  Thomas Jan 22 '13 at 21:23
    
I'm going to be really pedantic now - || is defined so that falsy || anything returns anything. So false || nil returns nil, while nil || false returns false :) –  Andy H Jan 22 '13 at 21:35
    
Egads, I was too hasty again. Thanks! –  Thomas Jan 22 '13 at 22:39
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If your values to test against are not contiguous, then the Array#include? is a good choice.

If the test values are continguous, and can be expressed as a Range, you could use:

Range#cover?
Range#include?
Range#member?

For example:

(1..3).member?(1) # => true

include? and member? are perhaps a bit more generic, defined in Enumerable, and so applicable to any collection object, or class derived from there. Enumerable also defines any?, used in another answer to this question, plus none? and one?.

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I tend to use (1..3) === 1, rather than (1..3).member?(1), but that's how I roll. –  the Tin Man Jan 19 '13 at 4:06
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The include method does what you want. Also, you could use the any? methods that pretty well expresses what you want:

[1, 2, 3].any? { |v| 1 == v }

But for equality you can just use include.

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The case when conditional supports multiple options:

x = 1
puts case x
  when 1, 2, 3 then "Low"
  when 4, 5, 6 then "High"
  else "Strange dice..."
end
#=>Low
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