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Take this simple class hierarchy:

Tree.h:

@interface Tree : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, assign) id<TreeDelegate> delegate;
@end

Tree.m:

@implementation Tree
@synthesize delegate;
@end

Aspen.h:

@interface Aspen : Tree
- (void)grow:(id<TreeDelegate>)delegate;
@end

Aspen.m:

@implementation Aspen
- (void) grow:(id<TreeDelegate>)d {
    self.delegate = d;
}
@end

When I try to do self.delegate = d;, I'm getting the following error:

-[Aspen setDelegate:]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x586da00

I was expecting the Tree parent class's delegate property to be visible to the subclass as-is, but it doesn't seem to be since the error indicates the parent class's synthesized setter isn't visible.

What am I missing? Do I have to redeclare the property at the subclass level? I tried adding @dynamic at the top of the implementation of Aspen but that didn't work either. Such a simple concept here, but I've lost an hour searching around trying to find a solution. Out of ideas at this point.

--EDIT--

The above code is just a very stripped-down example to demonstrate the issue I'm seeing.

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1  
I think we're going to need the actual code - after fixing the implmentation typo for Aspen, this works fine for me. –  Tim Jan 19 '13 at 0:01
    
@Tim Typo fixed, thanks. So - this should work as-is? –  Madbreaks Jan 19 '13 at 0:03
    
I can't post the actual code, but I've updated the example in my question to more closely reflect the actual source. –  Madbreaks Jan 19 '13 at 0:12
3  
@Madbreaks: Your stripped-down version looks good to me. The problem is certainly going to be found in the code you removed while stripping this down. –  Kevin Ballard Jan 19 '13 at 0:13
    
@KevinBallard et al, thanks. I will take another look at what I have and try to post more. –  Madbreaks Jan 19 '13 at 0:28

2 Answers 2

I just tried your code, supplemented by the protocol, an object implementing it, the necessary import and a main function and on my system it works like a charm:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@protocol TreeDelegate <NSObject>
@end

@interface MyDelegate : NSObject <TreeDelegate>
@end

@implementation MyDelegate
@end

@interface Tree : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, assign) id<TreeDelegate> delegate;
@end

@interface Aspen : Tree
- (void)grow:(id<TreeDelegate>)delegate;
@end

@implementation Tree
@synthesize delegate;
@end

@implementation Aspen
- (void) grow:(id<TreeDelegate>)d {
    self.delegate = d;
}
@end

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
    MyDelegate * d = [[MyDelegate alloc] init];
    Aspen * a = [[Aspen alloc] init];

    [a grow:d];
    return 0;
}
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Wow, ok. This at least confirms what I previously believed, that it should work this way. I will take another look at my code and see if I can spot any differences from what you have here. –  Madbreaks Jan 19 '13 at 0:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I was finally able to figure this out. My actual code leverages a 3rd party static library that defines the classes Tree and Aspen in my example. I had built a new version of the static library that exposed the Tree delegate given in my example, however I did not properly re-link the library after adding it to my project and as a result the old version was still being accessed at runtime.

Lessons learned: be diligent with steps to import a 3rd party library, and when simple fundamental programming concepts (such as in my example text) aren't working, take a step back and make sure you've dotted i's and crossed t's.

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