Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I plan to write Haxe libraries in a subset of Haxe that will compile to every Haxe target language. Is there any way to verify that a Haxe program will compile to all target languages, and is it possible to do this without manually testing the compiled code on each target platform?

For example, is there a way to ensure that the following code is valid on every target platform, without testing it manually on every single platform?

  class Test {
  static function main(){
    trace("How can I check to see which platforms this program will run on?");
  }
}

EDIT: I have written a compile.hxml file that compiles the class Test.hx to various target languages. All the necessary haxelib libraries will need to be installed first in order for it to work properly.

-js test.js
-main Test

--next
-php www
-main Test

--next
-cpp cpp
-debug
-main Test

--next
-main Test
-java java

--next
-cs test
-main Test
-D haxe3
share|improve this question
    
I want to avoid platform-specific features entirely when writing Haxe programs (to ensure that they will compile to as many languages as possible). –  Anderson Green Jan 19 '13 at 0:44
    
I hope it would be possible to generate a list of compatible platforms for a given source file. –  Anderson Green Jan 19 '13 at 0:49
    
I suppose that I could simply run the Haxe compiler for each target language, and then check its output to see which languages it had compiled to successfully. It would need to be compiled to each language using a single .hxml file. –  Anderson Green Jan 19 '13 at 0:52
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have done some similar things with a few of my libraries (mdown and detox), and I was able to test several of the platforms using MUnit / MassiveUnit:

https://github.com/massiveinteractive/MassiveUnit

This is a unit testing platform that you can use to check your behaviour across multiple targets. There is also utest, and possibly others.

Currently munit can automatically run tests for your code on the following targets:

  • Neko
  • Flash 8
  • Flash 9+
  • Javascript
  • CPP

There are instructions for adding support for other targets here

(If you don't know much about unit testing - it's a way to write lots of small tests to make sure your library/code behaves as expected, and is perfect for checking that things function across platforms, as well as making sure you don't break things when you change your code.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.