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I have the following code:

catch(Exception ex)
{
    throw new FatalException("An error occurred while trying to load the XSLT file.", ex);
}

This unfortunately just swallows up the Exception. I can fix this by doing the following:

catch(Exception ex)
{
    throw;
}

But I would still like to include the custom message for help with event logging.

How do I add this message to the exception without losing any information? (stack trace/debug symbols, etc.)

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Add the original exception as an InnerException on the FatalException? –  odyss-jii Jan 19 '13 at 0:56
    
It is at the end of throw new FatalException("message", ex). –  krillgar Jan 19 '13 at 0:58
1  
@Mark You can do that to add a user-friendly message that can be displayed to the user, and then do the logging on your own. If you have FatalException derive from ApplicationException, you'll be able to easily identify Exceptions that you added messages to versus Exceptions that are thrown anywhere else in the code. –  krillgar Jan 19 '13 at 1:01
1  
Yeah, the point of this is basically to have a user-friendly message (for logging purposes), but keep the original information in the Exception (for debugging purposes). –  Pheonixblade9 Jan 19 '13 at 1:05
2  
@krillgar Deriving from ApplicationException was the recommended practice in the past, but isn't anymore. That's because some framework exceptions actually derive from that class too. –  svick Jan 19 '13 at 1:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

That original Exception is still there.

When you do your Exception logging, the Exception that you receive will be the FatalException that you made with your message. The original Exception is in ex.InnerException. You can continue to cycle through InnerException until it's null to get all of the Stack Trace information, etc.

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If you just need to add information to the original exception, such as a user-readable message or specific details that will be useful to you in tracking down the error but that won't be useful to the end user, you can make use of the Exception's Data property, which is a key/value pair dictionary.

We use this extensively in order to record information such as the report being executed or file that is being processed so that operations can determine what exactly was happening at the time of the error. The user doesn't need this detail since they are working directly with the cause of the failure.

You could also use this to pass a plain text message that makes sense to the user. The only issue is that you will have to perform some additional work in your logging framework or end-user interface in order to extract the data and make it useful to the consumer.

For example, you could do:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    ex.Data.Add("UserMessage", "An error occurred while trying to load the XSLT file.");
    throw;
}

Then in the client-side code, you could test to see if UserMessage exists and, if so, present it to the user instead of the Exception:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    if (ex.Data.Contains("UserMessage"))
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Data["UserMessage"].ToString());
    }
    else
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
    }
}
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Even better would be ex.Data["UserMessage"] += "An error occurred..."; so that if some lower level code already added a message, it would append the extra text to it instead of throwing an ArgumentException –  KyleMit Feb 6 at 17:05

In short, don't.

I'm sure you could find some way of getting around this with some reflection, but I would strongly caution you against this. It goes against the original design of exceptions in .NET. Exceptions are not just there to help with logging, they provide information about the original cause of an application failure.

Using the first option is generally preferred as it maintains the stack trace of the original exception but allows you to provide additional information by wrapping it in a separate exception. In my own code, whenever I log exceptions, my logging function will recurse through the InnerException property to find every bit of useful information possible about the error.

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"Logging" may not be the best term to use for this. If you're doing something remote, you could just send an email for specific types of Exceptions when you don't have access to any logging. –  krillgar Jan 19 '13 at 1:09

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