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I'm creating a custom popover background, so I subclassed the UIPopoverBackground abstract class. While creating the layout function I came across a problem with placing and rotating the arrow for the background.

The first picture shows the arrow at the desired position. In the following code I calculated the origin I wanted but the rotation seemed to have translated the new position of the image off to the side about 11 points. As you can see, I created a hack solution where I shifted the arrow over 11 points. But that still doesn't cover up the fact that I have a gapping hole in my math skills. If someone would be so kind as to explain to me what's going on here I'd be eternally grateful. What also would be nice is a solution that would not involve magic numbers, so that I could apply this solution to the cases with the up, down and right arrow

screen shot

#define ARROW_BASE_WIDTH 42.0
#define ARROW_HEIGHT 22.0

    case UIPopoverArrowDirectionRight:
    {
        width -= ARROW_HEIGHT;
        float arrowCenterY = self.frame.size.height/2 - ARROW_HEIGHT/2 + self.arrowOffset;
        _arrowView.frame = CGRectMake(width,
                                      arrowCenterY,
                                      ARROW_BASE_WIDTH,
                                      ARROW_HEIGHT);
        rotation = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(M_PI_2);
        //rotation = CGAffineTransformTranslate(rotation, 0, 11);
         _borderImageView.frame = CGRectMake(left, top, width, height);
        [_arrowView setTransform:rotation];
    }
    break;
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1  
Well, if the rotation is applied about the center of the arrow view (as it is), that leaves a gap of (ARROW_BASE_WIDTH - ARROW_HEIGHT) / 2 to the post-rotation left of the arrow, which is what you have to compensate for, it seems. –  warrenm Jan 19 '13 at 3:12
    
Thank you for the response. This equation seems to explain the 11, and yes it is pinned to rotate around the center. But I'm sorry but I'm still a little perplexed at how you came to put these numbers together. Could you please explain the reasoning of why you'd subtract the height from the width and then divide by 2? –  Biclops Jan 19 '13 at 3:46
1  
If you have arrow height at 10 and base width at 20, so when you do 90 degree rotation, 10 become the horizontal length of the arrow which will leave the gap of 5 for each side. It is quite common formula for center-aligning object, you did use it for arrowCenterY and warrenm uses it to find the centered object location. –  tia Jan 19 '13 at 4:05
    
Mother of god, you're right. '(ARROW_BASE_WIDTH - ARROW_HEIGHT) / 2' is the refactored version of what I have. I think of more in terms of the distance from the center, baseWidth/2 and then subtracting the distance from the rotated base of the triangle, height/2. I was getting to hung up on widths and heights and forgot to consider center point. Thanks –  Biclops Jan 19 '13 at 4:47
    
Warrenm if you want to copy what you said as an answer I'll select it so that you can increase your rep. –  Biclops Jan 19 '13 at 4:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, if the rotation is applied about the center of the arrow view (as it is), that leaves a gap of (ARROW_BASE_WIDTH - ARROW_HEIGHT) / 2 to the post-rotation left of the arrow, which is what you have to compensate for, it seems. By offsetting the center of the arrow view by this much, it should come back into alignment.

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Thank you for the help. Much appreciated. –  Biclops Jan 19 '13 at 21:08

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