Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've heard from plenty of people saying that throwing errors in Node is bad practice, and you should rather manually handle them via CommonJS's callback syntax:

somethingThatPassesAnError( function(err, value) {
    if (err) console.log("ERROR: " + err);
});

Yet, I've found in multiple unit testing frameworks (Mocha, Should.js, Gently) that it seems like they want you to throw an error when something happens. I mean, sure, you can design your tests to check for equality of variables and check for not-null in error vars, but in the words of Ryan Dahl himself, "you should write your framework to make the right things easy to do and the wrong things hard to do".

So what gives? Can anyone explain why that practice exists? Should I start throwing fatal exceptions like require() would if the module couldn't be found?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It because nodejs programs typically make heavy use of async, and as a result errors are often thrown after your try/catch has already completed successfully. Consider this contrived example.

function foo(callback) {
  process.nextTick(function() {
    if (something) throw "error";
    callback("data");
  });
}

try {
  foo(function(data) {
    dosomething(data);
  });
} catch (e) {
  // "error" will not be caught here, as this code will have been executed
  // before the callback returns.
}

The typical node pattern, of the first argument in a callback being an error, obviates this problem, providing a consistent way to return errors from asynchronous code.

function foo(callback) {
  process.nextTick(function() {
    if (something) return callback("error");
    callback("data");
  });
}

foo(function(error, data) {
  if (error) return handleError(error);
  dosomething(data);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I understand why you'd want to use the CJS styling for callbacks in the event loop, but my question is why would we have throw functionality in the first place? Is there a way to styleize the console.log() to show significance to error objects? Is there any way to throw errors asynchronously? Is there any way to catch said thrown errors asynchronously for testing frameworks so that you can test for errors with an async lib just as well as a sync lib? –  Athan Clark Jan 19 '13 at 4:22
    
Why do you need to raise errors to test for them? Why not simply test for the returned error rather than the thrown & caught error? The way to "throw" errors asynchronously is by using the CJS pattern. And for synchronous bits of code, throw/catch is as useful as it ever was. There's no reason not to use it situationally. –  numbers1311407 Jan 19 '13 at 4:26
    
Because then in your testing suite you'd have to place error catching tests deep inside the callbacks while with sync. code you could place the whole chunk of code inside a should.throw()/should.not.throw(). It's a matter of being able to look from the outside vs. having to look on the inside. Call me lazy, but I think it would make testing / error handling way more consistent. –  Athan Clark Jan 19 '13 at 4:37
    
For TDD, you might call that a sign that you need more granular tests: unit tests for the different callbacks, and mocks/stubs for them when testing other parts of your app. –  numbers1311407 Jan 19 '13 at 17:21
add comment

It is my understanding that the case against throwing exceptions in JavaScript is due to the heavy use of asynchronous patterns. When an error occurs on another stack, you can't catch it. In those cases, use the err parameter as the first parameter for the callback.

I don't think that is the same as saying "never throw anything". If I have synchronous code, and an exception occurs, I throw it. There are differing opinions, but if callbacks aren't involved at all, I see no reason to not use throw.

share|improve this answer
    
See that's where I'm feeling things to be somewhat inconsistent - the sync vs. async styles are fairly similar: error handling is done in the block of code that recieves the result, and the error is generated in the block that returns the result. Like with the CJS, the error is passed to the callback but generated in caller. For sync code, you normally test to see if the result is an instanceOf Error. What gets me, though, is that if you choose to throw an Error in the sync code, it would be inconsistent with async - you'd have to just throw the Error rather than pass it as the first arg. –  Athan Clark Jan 19 '13 at 4:16
    
If I write a function that is supposed to return something, I never return an error. I throw exceptions when exceptional things happen. That's my philosophy... there are certainly others. To me, it just makes sense. I also agree with using the err parameter on a callback. I just don't see the point in not throwing, if you aren't using callbacks. –  Brad Jan 19 '13 at 4:17
    
Do you know of a way to "fake" throwing an error in an acync library so that it's consistent with try .. catch blocks? maybe by wrapping the try/catch on the callback attached to the event-loop itself? That way the exception will be caught in time? –  Athan Clark Jan 19 '13 at 4:25
    
No... not sure why you would want to do that, or how it would even work. You could do what Node.js libs do internally, where if an error event isn't handled, it goes up the stack. –  Brad Jan 19 '13 at 4:47
    
Yeah see that's what I'm saying. I'm not sure. I'm going to look into it. I heard that throwing an error vs. passing it might cause a performance hit. The main reason why I'd want to have throw functionality in an async. block is for TDD purposes - allowing me to test the whole block to see if it threw rather than having to test the internally passed error for equality of some value. It just makes code clearer. –  Athan Clark Jan 19 '13 at 4:58
add comment

I would suggest using exceptions to handle critical errors, much like the way require() works. If this functionality causes Node.js to misbehave, then that's a bug which I'm sure will get fixed in time.

share|improve this answer
    
throw doesn't cause Node.js to misbehave. It's not about bugs in Node.js... more of a stylistic question. –  Brad Jan 19 '13 at 4:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.