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I am attempting to sort three points for a triangle in order to add it successfully into a physics engine. All of the triangles whose position is smaller than 0.0 on the x axis show up correctly. However, after that point the first element (v[0]) is always set to {0.0, 0.0} and the rest seem okay. Here is my main function that does the sorting and adding.

void Core::addPoly(float x1, float y1, 
                   float x2, float y2, 
                   float x3, float y3) {

    std::vector<PVector> v(3);
    v.push_back(PVector(x1, y1));
    v.push_back(PVector(x2, y2));
    v.push_back(PVector(x3, y3));

    PVector center((x1+x2+x3)/3, (y1+y2+y3)/3);

    std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), [center](PVector b, PVector a) { 
        if (a.x >= 0 && b.x < 0)
            return true;
        if (a.x == 0 && b.x == 0)
            return a.y > b.y;

        // compute the cross product of vectors (center -> a) x (center -> b)
        float det = (a.x-center.x) * (b.y-center.y) - (b.x - center.x) * (a.y - center.y);
        if (det < 0)
            return true;
        if (det > 0)
            return false;

        // points a and b are on the same line from the center
        // check which point is closer to the center
        float d1 = (a.x-center.x) * (a.x-center.x) + (a.y-center.y) * (a.y-center.y);
        float d2 = (b.x-center.x) * (b.x-center.x) + (b.y-center.y) * (b.y-center.y);
        return d1 > d2;
    });

    emap->polys.push_back(Polygon(v[0], v[1], v[2]));
}

I am using the sorting function provided here. It originally had the first element of all triangles pointed to center (however I don't believe this is correct behaviour)- I switched a and b in the lambda declaration and now it only shows up after 0.0 on the x axis.

If we have 3 triangles passed in (Imagine | to be the 0.0 and _ to be 0.0 on a plane)

^     |
    ^ |   ^
______|_____________

The 0'th vertice of the third triangle will actually make it like this:

^     |
    ^ |  ___/|
______|_/______________

(This is supposed to be a triangle)

However, 0.0 was never passed to addPoly.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by billz, Sankar Ganesh, hjpotter92, Jan Dvorak, Stony Jan 19 '13 at 18:31

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
goto code_review; –  user405725 Jan 19 '13 at 4:26
    
@VladLazarenko Why? Is this not SO format? –  jett Jan 19 '13 at 4:30
    
@billz I don't understand why after a certain point a la past 0.0 on x axis the first element (PVector) v[0]is set to 0.0 since that number isn't passed as a number to be sorted. –  jett Jan 19 '13 at 4:38
    
Why is your vertex input not already guaranteed to be either CW or CCW? –  Steven Lu Jan 19 '13 at 14:11
1  
just be aware it will be quite a bit slower with that sort in there –  Steven Lu Jan 19 '13 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This line:

std::vector<PVector> v(3);

Causes your vector to get initialized with three <0.0,0.0> values. Changing it to

std::vector<PVector> v;

should fix your issue.

The code seems to work like this:

struct PVector 
{ 
    float x; 
    float y; 
    PVector(float x, float y) : x(x),y(y){}
    PVector() : x(0.0f), y(0.0f) {}
};


static void addPoly(float x1, float y1, 
                   float x2, float y2, 
                   float x3, float y3) {

    std::vector<PVector> v;
    v.push_back(PVector(x1, y1));
    v.push_back(PVector(x2, y2));
    v.push_back(PVector(x3, y3));

    PVector center((x1+x2+x3)/3, (y1+y2+y3)/3);

    std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), [center](PVector b, PVector a) -> bool { 
        if (a.x >= 0 && b.x < 0)
            return true;
        if (a.x == 0 && b.x == 0)
            return a.y > b.y;

        // compute the cross product of vectors (center -> a) x (center -> b)
        float det = (a.x-center.x) * (b.y-center.y) - (b.x - center.x) * (a.y - center.y);
        if (det < 0)
            return true;
        if (det > 0)
            return false;

        // points a and b are on the same line from the center
        // check which point is closer to the center
        float d1 = (a.x-center.x) * (a.x-center.x) + (a.y-center.y) * (a.y-center.y);
        float d2 = (b.x-center.x) * (b.x-center.x) + (b.y-center.y) * (b.y-center.y);
        return d1 > d2;
    });

    //emap->polys.push_back(Polygon(v[0], v[1], v[2]));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow.... I was trying to preallocate the vectors size by doing that. Well, I didn't know it actually added anything- just thought it would reserve the sizeof 3 vectors. Am I right in attempting to do this ^ And thanks for the answer, this was a dumb learning moment. It finally makes sense. (: –  jett Jan 19 '13 at 4:59
    
Did that fix it for you? I am not exactly sure what this code is attempting :) –  Tawnos Jan 19 '13 at 4:59
    
Yes it did. The reason for the semi convoluted is that this is a function referenced by boost python with values that cannot be predetermined (otherwise this issue would not arise to begin with). Thanks again, you have made my day. –  jett Jan 19 '13 at 5:47

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