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I have an html5 number input: <input type="number" />

I would like it to accept fractions and mixed numbers, such as 38 1/2 as well as whole numbers and decimals.

I parse the fractions server side.

Currently, when the input loses focus, the browser changes the input to 38.

A current workaround is using a plain text input, but I would like the benefits of using type="number" such as specific keyboards on mobile.

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wouldn't these "specific keyboards on mobile" not display the fraction character? –  yiding Jan 19 '13 at 5:40
    
Well, it seems it would on Android. For iOS Safari it just brings up the special characters 'page' of the keyboard that has the numbers. –  bookcasey Jan 19 '13 at 14:08

1 Answer 1

The <input type="number"> element is defined to create a browser-dependent browser-locale-dependent input control for entering numbers. There is no way to change this in your document, except in the sense that you can use attributes to specify the range and precision. So a browser could accept 38 1/2 and convert it internally to 38.5, but there is no way to say that it should, still less force it to do so. Moreover, the internal format of the numbers (as passed to the server) is defined strictly; it cannot be 38 1/2 for example.

So you need to use plain text input or some special widget (programmed in JavaScript). You can use the pattern attribute to specify the allowed format somehow, at least the allowed set of characters; this may or may not affect the on-screen keyboard displayed on touch devices (it probably won’t, for current devices).

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pattern doesn't allow me to specify numbers, decimals, and /s in a way that influences keyboards on mobile. +1, though. –  bookcasey Jan 19 '13 at 14:19

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