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*Note: Re-writing question:

I am trying to write the following outside of the individual function calls:

example:

function f1(){
    do something 1
}
function f2(){
    do something 2   
}

run function 1
when done
run function 2

(See comments below for jsfiddles)

Problem is, the boxes load at the same time. Behavior SHOULD be, load red, when done, load green.

If this isn't a common method in jQuery, let me know, maybe I'm just chasing a ghost...

share|improve this question
    
This is what I want to happen: jsfiddle.net/kolbaba/Wjmfw/1 These two are attempts at doing this: jsfiddle.net/kolbaba/7LvGS/3, jsfiddle.net/kolbaba/SCKTV/8 – nthChild Jan 19 '13 at 17:33
1  
Depending on what 'do something' is doing, the answers will change. If your 'do something' does anything that is asynchronous, then you will need to do some of the tricks provided below. However, if they are all synchronous calls, then they will execute synchronously. In otherwords, if there is no async, they will run in order if you just call them one after the other. – frosty Jan 20 '13 at 2:24
    
@aaronfrost it is an asynch attempt. I have 10 levels in a game, each level is a function. I want to pull fn's 1-10 into a lean clean function, without all the nested functions and effects and animations... See here for a visualization of what I mean: jsfiddle.net/kolbaba/c4LQv/1 – nthChild Feb 1 '13 at 14:44
    
let me know if you need any more help. If function 1 does anything async, then your code will not run as you expect. If any of the functions have async calls, then you have no guarantee in what order they will finish. Using deferreds as I showed below, will allow you to have a contract about what order the functions will execute in. If your functions only perform sync tasks, then you will not need deferreds. – frosty Feb 1 '13 at 17:02
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could simply call the second function at the end of the first.

 $(document).ready(function() {

  function firstFunction(){
    alert("this is the first function!");
    secondFunction();
  }
  function secondFunction(){
    alert("this is the second function!");
  }

  firstFunction();
});

fiddle

Alternatively, if you do not wish to call the second function every time you call the first, you could simply call them sequentially

firstFunction();
secondFunction();

This works because it will wait until firstFunction is done before it moves on to secondFunction fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but let me give you the use case. I have 10 point and click game levels created. and I've packaged them up in functions. (ie. function level1). I want to write a separate function at the top of the js file to pull each "level function" and "order" them how I see fit. This way it would be easier to swap levels around without having to hop into tons of code... does that make sense? run level1function, when done, run level2function, when done, run level3function and so on... – nthChild Jan 19 '13 at 7:20
    
@nthChild as long as you don't have anything asynchronous, placing a call to the next function at the end of the current one will do the trick. – BeardFist Jan 19 '13 at 7:24
    
@nthChild you mentioned point and click which would imply the need for click event handlers. You would have to show your code and markup for any specifics but if each level has a series of things to click on then the last one could have a .click(function(){nextlevel();}); to advance to the next level. If it is something based on clicking, then you will probably want it to be contained in click handlers and nothing directly sequential. – BeardFist Jan 19 '13 at 7:39

Depends on the functions.

Short answer:

For synchronous functions: Just call them one after the other.

For asynchronous functions: Depends on what makes it asynchronous.

jQuery animations? Define a callback parameter from the animation's method or from the fx queue's Promise object.

setTimeout/setInterval/something else? Most likely, the functions will need to be rewritten to provide a callback or Deferred/Promise object.

See this or this for examples.

Long answer:

According to the jsFiddles in your comments, you've got these two functions:

function firstFunction(){
    $(".one").fadeIn(1000).delay(2000).fadeOut();
}
function secondFunction(){
    $(".two").fadeIn(1000).delay(2000).fadeOut();
}

You want secondFunction to run after firstFunction, and you'd prefer not to tamper with these functions. If that's the case, there's only one solution I can think of: Get a Promise object from the element that firstFunction is animating, and then define secondFunction as a success handler:

firstFunction();
$('.one').promise().then(secondFunction);

jsFiddle

promise() returns a Promise object bound to the current animation state of that element. $('.one').promise().then(secondFunction) is essentially saying "I promise to run secondFunction when the current animation for .one is done.

If you're willing to tamper with the existing functions, you could also call secondFunction as a callback parameter of the fadeOut within firstFunction, but that's not a very elegant solution.

If you're willing to rewrite your functions, the ideal solution is to tame your async functions by using Deferreds and Promises. Here's a quick primer:

  • In jQuery, a Deferred object is a special object you can use to define the success/fail state of a function. You use this inside your functions.
  • A Promise object is a special object that you can use to add callbacks to those success/fail states. You use this outside your functions.

Using these tools, you can rewrite your functions to specify when they're "done," and you can give code outside your functions the ability to know when (and execute after) they're done.

Rewritten to use Deferred and Promise, the code looks like this:

function firstFunction(){
    var deferred = $.Deferred();
    $(".one").fadeIn(1000).delay(2000).fadeOut(function() {
        deferred.resolve();
    });
    return deferred.promise();
}
function secondFunction(){
    var deferred = $.Deferred();
    $(".two").fadeIn(1000).delay(2000).fadeOut(function() {
        deferred.resolve();
    });
    return deferred.promise();
}

firstFunction().then(secondFunction);

jsFiddle

If all your functions are written this way, you can control their execution order and have them run sequentially using then(). Here's a more thorough example:

function one(){
    var deferred = $.Deferred();
    $(".one").fadeOut(500, function() {
        $(this).appendTo('body').fadeIn(500, function() { deferred.resolve(); });
    });
    return deferred.promise();
}

function two(){
    var deferred = $.Deferred();
    $(".two").fadeOut(1500, function() {
        $(this).appendTo('body').fadeIn(500, function() { deferred.resolve(); });
    });
    return deferred.promise();
}

function three(){
    var deferred = $.Deferred();
    $(".three").fadeOut(1000, function() {
        $(this).appendTo('body').fadeIn(500, function() { deferred.resolve(); });
    });
    return deferred.promise();
}

function four(){
    var deferred = $.Deferred();
    $(".four").fadeOut(750, function() {
        $(this).appendTo('body').fadeIn(500, function() { deferred.resolve(); });
    });
    return deferred.promise();
}

function five(){
    var deferred = $.Deferred();
    $(".five").fadeOut(600, function() {
        $(this).appendTo('body').fadeIn(500, function() { deferred.resolve(); });
    });
    return deferred.promise();
}

one()
    .then(two)
    .then(three)
    .then(four)
    .then(five);

jsFiddle

share|improve this answer

Deferreds are an option. You could always do the following:

$.when(firstFunction()).then(secondFunction);

The only trick is that inside firstFunction, you would need to do the following:

function firstFunction(){
    var deferred = $.Deffered();

    $.get(url,function(r){
        deferred.resolve();
    });

    return deferred;
}

The when function will wait until the deferred returned by the firstFunction call is resolved. Once the deferred is resolved (in the ajax success callback) the '.then' statement will fire, calling your secondFunction.

The jQuery docs explain the Deferred API very well.

share|improve this answer

you can use the jquery Callbacks function, from v1.7up

var callbacks = $.Callbacks();
callbacks.add( firstFunction );
callbacks.add( secondFunction );
callbacks.fire( );
share|improve this answer
    
fiddle: jsfiddle.net/7LvGS – Koenyn Jan 19 '13 at 8:10
    
Unfortunately this doesn't work if the functions are asynchronous. jsfiddle.net/7LvGS/4 – JR. Jan 20 '13 at 15:56

instead of

 firstFunction(function(){
        secondFunction();
    });

write

firstFunction();
secondFunction();
share|improve this answer
    
Hi George, I tried this, here: jsfiddle.net/kolbaba/SCKTV/5... it seems to load the functions at the same time, rather than one, then the other... your thoughts? – nthChild Jan 19 '13 at 8:01
    
I put the following code in the javascript section: $(document).ready(function() { var i = 'a'; function firstFunction(){ i = i+ '_first_func'; $(".one").fadeIn(1000).delay(2000).fadeOut(); } function secondFunction(){ i = i+ '_second_func'; $(".two").fadeIn(1000).delay(2000).fadeOut(); } firstFunction(); secondFunction(); alert(i); }); The result was a_first_func_second_func – GeorgeVremescu Jan 19 '13 at 9:10

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