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What's the output of the following code?

class A {
    public int data=5;
    private int pd = 6;

    public void print() {
        System.out.println(data+pd);
        f();
    }

    protected void f() {
        System.out.println(“A::f()”);
    }
}

class B extends A {
    public int data=2;
    private int pd = 3;

    public void print() {
        super.print();
        System.out.println(data+pd);
    } 

    protected void f() {
        System.out.println(“B::f()”);
    }
}

public class TestAB {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a = new B();
        a.print();
        System.out.println(a.data);
    }
}

The output is:

11
B::f()
5
5

Well all I know is that the object a is of class B. But the following details are so confusing...Could anybody explain what's happening with the same variables defined in base and inherited class? Which print()' or print()'s are called?

Thank you for your time.

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"What's the output of the following code?" sounds like a homework question huh? :) –  Jon Dinham Jan 19 '13 at 7:25
1  
@PaulDinh A question from last year's final. Preparing for this year's :) –  goldfrapp04 Jan 19 '13 at 7:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you call a.print();, The print function of class B will be called. Hope you are clear with that (polymorphism). In the print() method of B class, super.print() is called which in turn has a call to method f(). Again on polymorphism principle, class B's f() method will be called.

Polymorphism works only on functions. Hence System.out.println(a.data); in the main function just prints the A class variable which is 5 and not 2. Hope you understood this.

Please refer this link:

http://www.coderanch.com/t/392179/java/java/Polymorphism-data-members

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Correct. The key phrase is "polymorphism works only on functions". –  Alex Kreutznaer Jan 19 '13 at 7:34
    
Thank you. Also I just found out that a is of class A, is that correct? I was mislead to the belief that a is of class B because I print(a.getClass()), which also fell in the trap of polymorphism. –  goldfrapp04 Jan 19 '13 at 7:36
    
a is of class A, but pointing to an instance of B. So return value of a.getClass() also makes sense –  LPD Jan 19 '13 at 7:45

"About clones"

Well, you won't understand because of a big mistake: class B is the A extending class. Meaning at first of all there is a class a, nothing more.

Maybe imagine its a clone of yourself but without many instruction what to do next but it can already walk and sleep as you can do but it cant speak and doesnt know how to eat or playing the piano. So this poor guy wont exist very long for himself, but you had known what you was doing: All you have to do is to clone the clone and make the next one better than the first. The second can eat, drink and many other funny things but it's not able to speak. So you create one, two and three others. One can talk to your friends and is happy to live it's life without being feed. The next is doing all your works and the last will turn the lights of.

Let's think about the beginning: you made a stupid clone, but it had two features - walk and sleep. Because of it's pioneer state you can call him clone A or even better the class A clone.

Whilest your next cloning operations you constructed the successful class B clone. This one extends the class A clone primarily by two new strengths: eat and drink. For being able to do this you also added the informations where to find the fridge and the bar to class B clone's wayfinding system. In cause of that reason you had to overrite the walking dna of class A clone. How could this look like?


The first clone:

class CloneA
{
    void walk()
    {
        Position p = getRandomPosition();
        walkTo( p );
    };
    void sleep()
    {
        sleepy = sleepy - 1;
    }
    void main()
    {
        if ( itIsLate() )
            sleep();
        else
            walk();
    }
}

The main program of it controlles the clone when to sleep or when it should walk around. It is using three already known methods at all: getRandomPosition(), walkTo( Position ) and itIsLate(). You found this practical stuff on your old phone and gave it to the clone which has to much more senseful things with it's time. Let's having a look at the class B clone for instance. CloneB got mainly two more Abilities:

void drink();
void eat();

As you planned before, you won't need the create a complete new Clone, you've got already a perfect parent. This one inherits all of it's knowledge to the new one. All that's left else is to modify the walking method. Otherwise it won't find out where to get the items it can handle now.


So the structure of the second could look that:

class CloneB extends CloneA
{
    void drink() { thursty = thursty - 1; }
    void eat()   { hungry  = hungry  - 1; }

    @Override
    void walk()
    {
        if ( itIsEary() || itIsLate() )
        {
            Position fp = fridgePosition;
            walkTo( fp );
            eat();
            Position bp = barPosition;
            walkTo( bp );
            drink();
        }
        else
            super.walk();
    }
}

The CloneB now checks the time, everytime it's searching for a new Position to go to. If it recognizes a late or (||) an early time it'll remember the Positions of the fridge and a bar and starts to walk there one after another, eats, drinks and when the time has come it will invoke the walk() instructions of its parent CloneA by super.walk(); That's good for you, you don't need to give the same commands twice.

When you're looking at this two creatures you can see a few differences, but the most of their characteristics are identically. Maybe you've had already think about that CloneB is truely a CloneA. Any identifier that makes CloneA to CloneA is also inherited by CloneB. Even more - a CloneB can take care of itself! It's a sadly fact that CloneA can't never be a CloneB.

If you now would do the following simple test with both of them, you should understand one of the main rules in object oriented languages:

  • Put your both clones into a little room with only one door.
  • Write the name CloneA on a paper and stick it on the door.
  • Tell your clones that only these clones can enter the door to paradise from whom the name is which written on the paper.
  • Get yourself to paradise and retry the experiment a few times. After a short while you can be sure: the chance you see CloneA or CloneB is at a value of 50%. The both are having the same way finding method for unknown objects and they are also both feeling like a CloneA, so its pure random. You're now also at another disadvantage; Both clones are looking identically and the only thing you know at this time is, that the entered must have the attributes of CloneA.
  • Come again next day and write the name of CloneB on the paper sticking at the door. You got it. CloneA will never pass the door if it's a honest clone. You can be sure. This is a CloneB.

It's exactly the same in Java. The instances of your clones, let's name these cA and cB act in the same way:

CloneA cA = new CloneA();
CloneB cB = new CloneB();

// assign cloneB instance to cloneA instance:
cA = cB;

// error by default:
cB = cA;

As in the sample you wrote is shown you could also do the following ( paradise method ):

CloneA cA = new CloneB();

Con: at this time cA is a CloneB indeed, but if you want to give CloneB specific instructions this is either impossible or unsafe. Who knows if it is living anymore when you are on vacation?

But you're not helpless then. You can ask the clone about its inheritance. Also here it's possible that they can't tell you or are just giving wrong informations. It's often advantageous to know what they could possible be and then ask them if they are these ones you asked them for or not. After that you can be sure and speak to your CloneA instance as it were a CloneB. For example:

CloneA cA = new CloneB();

if ( cA instanceof CloneB )
    ( CloneB ) cA.eat();

If you don't want to interact with them anymore, don't care about. The instance of cA has been overwritten with the new CloneB information and is going to eat and drink, independend if you know who he is exactly. What you've done in the last code sniplet is called type casting. Another usual method for doing the same is:

CloneB.class.cast( cA ).eat();

// or storing in a new variable for an easier later handling
CloneB cB = CloneB.class.cast( cA );

Now we forgot almost the last three practical clones. But every clone does only have one single method to extend. How you're planning your cloning civilization is not on me and Java mostly offers a rich set of alternative ways for doing the same. To keep it simple let's say you decided to clone CloneB three times. The tasks of these three clones are too different to combine. At their first birthday you'll give them a historical present - their first familiy tree:

                     TalkerClone
                  /
CloneA  -  CloneB  -  WorkerClone
                  \
                     LightSwitchClone

So now begin to teach them: Everyone of you is inimitable, but in you all are a part of CloneB and (Grand-) CloneA...

Finally I should not forget you question. Maybe you can answer it for yourself now, but for completeness:

class A {
    public int data=5;                // 13.
    private int pd = 6;

    public void print() {             // 6.
        System.out.println(data+pd);  // 7. ( output "11" )
        f();                          // 8.
    }

    protected void f() {
        System.out.println(“A::f()”);
    }
}

class B extends A {                   // 2.
    public int data=2;
    private int pd = 3;

    public void print() {             // 4.
        super.print();                // 5.
        System.out.println(data+pd);  // 11. ( output 5 )
    } 

    protected void f() {               // 9.
        System.out.println(“B::f()”);  // 10. ( output "B::f()" )
    }
}

public class TestAB {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a = new B();               // Command A; 1.
        a.print();                   // Command B; 3.
        System.out.println(a.data);  // Command C; 12. ( output 5, 2nd )
    }
}

If you're not sure where the command C, 12th is coming from do the paradise experiment again.

I would advise you to inform yourself about the modificators (public, protected, etc...) to make inheritance more useful for your applications.

Good luck and have many fun with your clones :)

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