Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This is not a question. I would like to cover a scarcely documented part of R.

a <- 0.3-0.1 # should be 0.2

b <- 0.7-0.5 # should also be 0.2

However, due to floating point representation,

a==b
[1] FALSE

From the documentation, there are two correct ways to boolean check the equality:

isTRUE(all.equal(a,b))

identical(all.equal(a,b), TRUE)

What is not immediately obvious is that if one wants to check all of >, <, == in one if .. else if .. else if structure, then the test of equality must be conducted prior to the other two tests. Since either of
a > b or a < b can unpredictably turn out to be TRUE - again, due to floating point numerical fuzzyness.

Example of unwanted behaviour:

if (a < b)
{
    print('a smaller than b')

} else if (a > b) {
    print('a greater than b')

} else if (isTRUE(all.equal(a,b))) {
    print('a equal b')
}

[1] "a smaller than b"

I hope this will help.

Kind regards, luca

share|improve this question
8  
A better way to post this is to ask it as a question: "Why do I get this result when I do such and such?". You can then answer your own question. That is better than just writing an answer disguised as a question ;) – nico Jan 19 '13 at 9:35
1  
@nico maybe the OP don't have enough votes to answer his own question:) – agstudy Jan 19 '13 at 10:16
    
@agstudy: is there a rep limit to do that? – nico Jan 19 '13 at 12:46
    
@nico Users with less than 100 reputation can't answer their own question for 8 hours. – agstudy Jan 19 '13 at 12:53
    
FYI: isTRUE(x) is a function that evaluates to identical(x, TRUE) – Ricardo Saporta Jan 19 '13 at 15:10

If I run your code, I get

> [1] "a greater than b"

This is not unexpected. Taking a tip from the first circle of the R inferno and looking at more digits

> print(c(a,b,a-b), digits=20)
[1] 1.9999999999999998335e-01 1.9999999999999995559e-01
[3] 2.7755575615628913511e-17

so it is no surprise R thinks a > b is TRUE.

To deal with this, you could have written something like

if        (a < b & ! isTRUE(all.equal(a, b))) {
    print('a smaller than b')

} else if (a > b & ! isTRUE(all.equal(a, b))) {
    print('a greater than b')

} else if (a == b |  isTRUE(all.equal(a, b))) {
    print('a equals b')
}
share|improve this answer

This is what the OP meant as a solution:

if (isTRUE(all.equal(a, b))) {
    print('a equals b')
} else if (a > b) {
    print('a greater than b')
} else if (a < b) {
   print('a smaller than b')
}

By ruling out all.equal-ity first, you can then trust that < and > will do what was intended. This way, there is no need for repeated usage of all.equal.

share|improve this answer

Alternatively, you can include a threshold value.

thresh <- 1e-12

if (a - b > thresh)        {
    print('a greater than b')
} else if (b - a > thresh) {
    print('a smaller than b')
} else {
    print('a equals b')
}
share|improve this answer
    
all.equal does that for you. You just need to use it first. – 42- Jan 19 '13 at 19:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.