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Ok it's 19 Jan 2013 22:30 NZST and most of the internet seems to have come to a crawl as Google Analytics seems to be running really slow. Stackoverflow, Firefox.com, reddit and google searches are slow. Most importantly for me, my production business website is running slow or not loading at all. No it's not just my connection I tested it on my phone with 3G as well. Sites without Google Analytics seemed to be running fine.

Here's a few screenshots of what happens

This is in the bottom left corner of the Firefox window. It will sit there for 20+ seconds like that. I'd like it to go away after 3 seconds if it can't connect.

enter image description here

This spinning green image is in the Firefox tab and just sits there making it look like the page is still loading for 20+ seconds. I'd like it to go away after 3 seconds if it can't connect.

enter image description here

Now it may not be Google Analytics, my country' international gateway may be running slow or something. But evidence strongly suggests it might be Google Analytics. Now even if it isn't Google Analytics then I'd still be interested in some methods to counter it if the service is completely down. So hypothetically lets assume there's a massive fire at the datacenter of Google Analytics and the fire suppression systems failed. Now Google Analytics goes completely offline for several days. No backup servers. No standby datacenters. Hypothetical scenario ok. Now my site still needs to run as I can't afford to have my site reliant on Google Analytics service being up. But the analytics functionality would be good to have as an added bonus if the service is actually running in a timely manner.

Ok so I'm throwing out some ideas here:

  1. Is there's a timeout I can add to my script that will cancel the connection to Google Analytics and halt the request/download if it's taking too long? Then it would continue loading my site after 2 seconds.
  2. Or better yet, perhaps it can just load my site completely, then send a request off to Google Analytics using Ajax after my site is completely finished loading? Why doesn't it do this by default?

Here's the code we have to work with which is currently inserted just before the closing </body> tag.

<script type="text/javascript">
    var _gaq = _gaq || [];
    _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-123456789-1']);
    _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);
    (function() {
        var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
        ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
        var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
    })();
</script>

Now, what are some methods I could employ that would fix this hypothetical disaster scenario and give my website continuity while Google Analytics is down? I'm interested in either potential software or hardware solutions. Assume I have full access to a Linux VPS which my PHP/MySQL/HTML5 website is running on.

Also, what's the authoritative answer on this: some people say place the code before the closing </head> tag. Others say place it before the closing </body> tag. Which is the best way?

Many thanks

Solution Update

Ok I've found out what works with help from Jaspal. The solution is below.

<script type="text/javascript">
    // Load Google Analytics after my site has completely loaded
    // Then when Google Analytics request is made it won't show any visuals in the browser
    setTimeout(loadGoogleAnalytics, 5000);

    // Setup _gaq array as global so that the code in the ga.js file can access it
    var _gaq = _gaq || [];
    _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-123456789-1']);
    _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);

    /**
     * Loads Google Analytics
     */
    function loadGoogleAnalytics()
    {
        var srcUrl = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';

        $.ajax(
        {
            url: srcUrl,
            cache: true,
            dataType: "script",
            success: function(data)
            {
                console.log('got the script');
            },
            error: function()
            {
                console.log('failed to get the script');
            },
            timeout: 5000
        });
    };
</script>

Basically why it works is because there is a setTimeout for 5 seconds. This gives my page enough time to load all the content, JS, CSS, images etc. Then after that it kicks off the $.ajax request and downloads ga.js and __utm.gif which is actually sending the data to Google Analytics. After that initial 5 seconds, basically all the browser visuals I mentioned earlier disappear and the Google Analytics request happens silently in the background with no loading visuals for the browser user. Then I tried blocking Google Analytics with the host file and I still don't get any browser visuals - perfect.

It should be noted that the timeout: 5000 property in the $.ajax request doesn't appear to do anything. Originally I was hoping it would abort the request if it couldn't get data for 5 seconds but there's a note in the API docs saying

In Firefox 3.0+ only, script and JSONP requests cannot be cancelled by a timeout; the script will run even if it arrives after the timeout period.

I'll leave it in there anyway just in case. From my testing if Google Analytics can't be reached (from observing the Net/Network panel in Firebug/Chrome) then it will abort the request after 21-23 seconds in Firefox and 16 seconds in Chrome. This may be some TCP timeout. I'm not worried about that anyway as it's timing out silently and the user will not notice as there's no loading visuals in the browser.

I have accepted Jaspal's answer below and awarded him the bounty as his solution was critical to solving this. However his solution still has loading visuals appearing in the browser. So I believe the solution posted here using the setTimeout (a slight modification on his original one) is the way to go and is tested to be working 100% for me.

share|improve this question
3  
the google analytics script is async, I don't see how loading it would slow your website at all since it wouldn't block... –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jan 19 '13 at 10:18
    
It says it's 'async' in the code... but is it really? –  zuallauz Jan 19 '13 at 10:20
1  
yes, it is, notice it adds the script tag dynamically which means the browser won't wait for it –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jan 19 '13 at 10:21
    
@Benjamin Here's what happens. This is in the bottom left corner of the Firefox window. It will sit there for 20+ seconds like that. Then this spinning green image is in the Firefox tab and just sits there making it look like the page is still loading for 20+ seconds. I'd like both 'loading' visuals to go away after 3 seconds if it can't connect to Google Analytics. –  zuallauz Jan 19 '13 at 11:30
    
@Benjamin It's not doing a proper Ajax request. It's inserting a script tag into the page which causes those loading visuals. If I do a jQuery.ajax() request and block off the google-analytics addresses in my hosts file and refresh the page, the loading visuals disappear and in the Net panel of Firebug I can see that the ajax request is still waiting on Google Analytics. Eventually it times out after 21 secs. But the good thing about that is it's not showing loading visuals in Firefox and not blocking my website. Now how do I rewrite the GA code to use jQuery.ajax? –  zuallauz Jan 19 '13 at 11:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

Latest Approach :

  1. We allow ga to load normally.
  2. We store a reference to ga dom element in a global variable (gaClone).
  3. We set a timeout of 30seconds. We also set another global variable (loadedGoogleAnalytics) and set it to 0 initially. When ga loads, we set this variable to 1. On the timeout expiry, we check whether ga was loaded or not. If not, we delete the dom element ga.

    <script type="text/javascript">
        var loadedGoogleAnalytics = 0;
        var gaClone;
        var _gaq = _gaq || [];
        _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-123456789-1']);
        _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);
    
        _gaq.push(function() {
            loadedGoogleAnalytics = 1;
            //console.log('GA Actualy executed!');
        });
    
        (function() {
            var ga = document.createElement('script'); ga.type = 'text/javascript'; ga.async = true;
            ga.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';
            var s = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(ga, s);
    
            gaClone = ga;
    
        })();
    
        setTimeout(function() {
            //console.log('timeout fired');
            if (loadedGoogleAnalytics != 1) {
                gaClone.parentNode.removeChild(gaClone); 
            }
        }, 30000);
    </script>
    

[I have verified this approach with one of my actual GA accounts and i am able to see all the realtime tracking]

Previous Approach [Note: Ga does not execute if we try to place it in (document).ready();] [This solution does not work]

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function() {
            var _gaq = _gaq || [];
            _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-123456789-1']);
            _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);

            srcUrl = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://ssl' : 'http://www') + '.google-analytics.com/ga.js';

            $.ajax({
                url: srcUrl,
                cache: true,
                dataType: "script",
                success: function(data) {
                    //console.log('got the script');
                },
                error: function() {
                    //console.log('failed to get the script');
                },
                timeout: 30000
            });
        });
</script>

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
That gets the ga.js file asynchronously which is good and I like the timeout idea. However it still doesn't initiate the request to actually send the data to Google Analytics. If you watch the NET panel in firebug, nothing is actually sent and if you monitor Google Analytics Live section no page hits come through. So this solves half the problem but the ga.js code is not run when it finishes downloading. I think that ga.js initiates something else which sends the data to google analytics, or it requests a 1x1px gif file or something. –  zuallauz Jan 26 '13 at 21:37
    
Ok I've figured something out, the _gaq array needs to be initialised in the global scope so it can't be initialized inside the $(document).ready function. I've got something working with a setTimeout which loads the ga.js code and __utm.gif after 10 seconds. Now to see if it'll work with the $.ajax. –  zuallauz Jan 27 '13 at 5:55
    
Also interesting note on the jQuery.ajax timeout property: "In Firefox 3.0+ only, script and JSONP requests cannot be cancelled by a timeout; the script will run even if it arrives after the timeout period." so I've been testing on Firefox which is another issue. I'll switch to Chrome for testing. –  zuallauz Jan 27 '13 at 6:10
1  
Many thanks for that. I think the original method you posted works better but I made a slight modification to it. See my updated solution posted in the original question. I think your updated solution still shows the loading visuals in the browser if it is waiting on Google Analytics for a long time. I've been testing it with setting the google-analytics.com to some unreachable IP address in the host file, like 222.128.211.222 so it just sits there trying to connect for 16secs+. My method it just fails silently in the background but you can monitor the progress on the Network tab. –  zuallauz Jan 27 '13 at 9:18
2  
The reason GA doesn't execute when your wrap the whole thing in DOM Ready is because _gaq becomes scoped as a local variable, which ga.js then can't access. Move the var _gaq declaration to the global scope and it'll work just fine. –  Yahel Feb 3 '13 at 1:58

Given where it's loaded, the rest of your site would load before the request to Google Analytics. Plus GA is loaded asynchronously, not halting the execution of any of your code, so I really don't see there being an issue.

share|improve this answer
    
In theory yes, but I'm not seeing it in practice. Can I test this somehow like firewall off the Google Analytics server IPs then see what happens? –  zuallauz Jan 19 '13 at 10:24
    
well what are you seeing in practice? –  sevenseacat Jan 19 '13 at 10:24
    
In bottom left corner of firefox, the status shows: Transferring from google-analytics.com... Then stays there for a long time like that. –  zuallauz Jan 19 '13 at 10:26
1  
That's to be expected. And the rest of the site? –  sevenseacat Jan 19 '13 at 10:26
2  
@zuallauz If you want to test it, just put ssl.google-analytics.com and www.google-analytics.com in your local hosts file (ie the machine that runs the browser) and point them to a non existing IP outside of your lan. That'll simulate a "no response". –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 19 '13 at 10:32

You could host a copy of www.google-analytics.com/ga.js on your own server and load it from there. If you do go that route, I'd set up a cron job to periodically fetch ga.js to make sure you've got the most recent version.

Regarding tracking code placement: one of the main reasons for placing the tracking code earlier in the page (before </head>) has to do with visitors who leave the page quickly (possibly before the entire page has rendered). In that case, you're more likely to collect some data the sooner your tracking code is executed.

share|improve this answer

Trying to fix something that isn't broken

If you want to use Google analytics you are going to need to communicate with there server some how, period. There service, as pointed out by many of the other answers, run asynchronously meaning it doesn't prevent your site from running what so ever. The 'loading visuals' are there to show something is loading... there is very little you can do about this.

You have two options; put up with Google analytics or use some server side script to run analytics.

If the website is hanging it is because of something else.

Edit

Also not including GA immediately also reduces the accuracy of the stats; bounce rates in particular will not be correct.

share|improve this answer
4  
I disagree. Loading visuals in the browser should be indicating to the user that there's content on the page that they need that hasn't finished loading ie, text, images, video etc. Having loading visuals for a connection to Google Analytics is counter-productive. No user cares whether their statistics are sent to Google Analytics or not, they just want to view the content of the page. So if the page is constantly in 'loading' state when Google Analytics is performing slowly then the user thinks the page hasn't fully loaded yet. Also why does it take a full 21 seconds for it to time out? –  zuallauz Jan 24 '13 at 18:42
    
Well I guess we are just going to have to disagree. You can't have one rule for scripts that will affect visual content and one for scripts that don't... there is no distinction between them. I also strongly doubt there is anything Google-end throttling the loading of their scripts. AVG (or any other antivirus) have web security plugins that may be doing some shady jobs that check Google's scripts against their know database, slowing down the process. –  lededje Feb 1 '13 at 13:54
    
Many studies have shown that if a website takes longer than 3 seconds to load on a broadband connection (8-10 secs on 56K modem) then trust & credibility is negatively impacted and 40% of your visitors will abandon your site before they've even entered it. If I can get it loading completely in under 3 seconds without Google Analytics and Google Translate, then load those separately via Ajax a few seconds later then that's a good win. And I have managed to do that if you read the question and solution. I got it down from 6.3 secs full load time to 3.6 secs just by doing that. That's good. –  zuallauz Feb 1 '13 at 23:50
    
I'm dubious that someone will leave your site because of GA taking a while to load as it doesn't effect the visual look of the site; to an untrained observer it has finished. As for the studies that show you lose trust and credibility if ajaxed content takes a while to load, please link them, I would be interested in reading these. I'm wondering what engine parses and runs javascript to obtain true page load times but isn't able to differentiate between asynchronous and synchronous libraries. –  lededje Feb 5 '13 at 11:16
1  
The end user should not be given any kind of diminished experience of your site simply because some external tracking script failed to load. I'm currently dealing with this problem for a client in China. google-analytics.com is periodically and unpredictably blocked, resulting in the "loading" elipsis icon in Chrome continually turning until it timesout at 1:30min. And this happens when using the google recommended async code. This only happens about 10% of the time, so we want to keep the GA code because it's still useful. Still it would be nice if it didn't affect UX! –  rwired Jul 14 at 15:05

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