Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I noticed if I include a header file in a .cpp then I can create an object of that header file's class. Like if I includeA.h in main.cpp then I can write A *a; in main.cpp. But this doesn't work if I include a header file in another header file and then try to create the object of that included header file. Like,

file B.h:

#include "A.h"
class B
{
public:
    B(){};
    A *a;
};

I have to add forward declaration of the class A to make it work. Why?

share|improve this question
    
Because you're not giving us an honest example and the real header files contain include guards? –  Kerrek SB Jan 19 '13 at 10:44
    
@kerrek yes it has include guards. –  Tahlil Jan 19 '13 at 10:46
1  
Well then. Make a representative example of your problem, and I'm sure you can figure it out even without posting here :-) –  Kerrek SB Jan 19 '13 at 10:55
2  
Note that A *a, doesn't declare an object of type A as you seem to think. It declares an object of type A*. Such an object is referred to as pointer-to-A in C++. –  Nawaz Jan 19 '13 at 10:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here are the basics:

  • For any type A, if you declare a variable of type A&, A*, A**, A***,etc, then the compiler does not need to know the complete definition of A at the site of variable declaration. All it needs to know that A is a type; that is it. So a forward declaration is enough:

    class A; //forward declaration
    
    class B
    {
       A * pA;  //okay - compiler knows A is a type
       A & refA;/ okay - compiler knows A is a type
    };
    

    The complete definition is not required because the compiler can still compute sizeof(B) which in turn depends on sizeof(A*) and sizeof(A&) — these are known to the compiler, even though it doesn't know sizeof(A). Note that sizeof(A*) is just a size of pointer on that platform (which is usually 4 bytes on 32bit system or 8 bytes on 64bit system).

  • For any type A, if you declare a variable of type A, A[N], A[M]N] etc, then the compiler needs to know the complete definition of type A at the site of variable declaration. A forward declaration would not be enough in this case.

    class A; //forward declaration
    class B
    {
       A a;  //error - the compiler only knows A is a type
             //it doesn't know its size!
    };
    

    But this is correct:

    #include "A.h" //which defines A
    
    class B
    {
       A a;  //okay
    };
    

    The complete definition is required so that the compiler could compute sizeof(A), which is not possible if the compiler doesn't know definition of A.

    Note that definition of a class means "the complete specification of the class members, their types, and whether the class has virtual function(s) or not". If the compiler knows these, it can compute the size of the class.

Knowing these basics, you can decide whether to include headers to other headers or only forward declaration would be enough. If the forward declaration is enough, that is the option you should choose. Include a header only if it is required.

However if you provide forward declaration of A in the header B.h, then you have to include the header file A.h in the implementation file of B which is B.cpp, because in the implementation file of B, you need to access the members of A for which the compiler requires the complete definition of A. Well again, include only if you need to access the members of A. :-)


Sorry I didn't see the last paragraph of your answer. What is confusing me is why do I need the forward declaration also. Doesn't including the header file A.h alone provides complete definition of class A?? –

I don't know what is there in the header file. Also, if in spite of including the header file, you also need to provide the forward declaration, then it implies that the header is implemented incorrectly. I suspect that there is a circular dependency:

  • Make sure that no two header files include each other. For example, if A.h includes B.h, then B.h must not include A.h, directly or indirectly.

  • Use forward declaration and pointer-declaration to break such circular dependency. The logic is pretty much straight-forward. If you cannot include A.h in B.h, which implies you cannot declare A a in B.h (because for this, you have to include the header A.h also). So even though you cannot declare A a, you can still declare A *pA, and for this a forward declaration of A is enough. That way you break the circular dependency.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
My question was something else. I asked why its is possible in a cpp file to include a header file and create the class object but why not in a hpp file?? in hpp file I need both header and forward declaration to create a class object. –  Tahlil Jan 19 '13 at 10:53
    
@kalkin: My answer covers the basics first, then explains why you need what. It doesn't specifically answers one. Only if you understand the basics, you would be able to answer all questions related to declaration, or forward declaration. –  Nawaz Jan 19 '13 at 10:55
    
Sorry I didn't see the last paragraph of your answer. What is confusing me is why do I need the forward declaration also. Doesn't including the header file A.h alone provides complete definition of class A?? –  Tahlil Jan 19 '13 at 11:01
1  
@kalkin: Including the header file should be sufficient, unless you have circular references (i.e. the header A.h directly or indirectly includes header B.h) –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Jan 19 '13 at 11:05
1  
@kalkin: I don't know what is there in the header file. Also, if inspite of including the header file you need to provide the forward declaration, then it implies that the header is implemented incorrectly. I suspect that there is circular dependency. –  Nawaz Jan 19 '13 at 11:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.