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I'm trying to setup a system of linked worker pools that look like this:

 ╭────────╮                  ╭─────────╮                  ╭─────────╮
 │        ├──> Worker 1 ───> │         ├──> Worker 3 ───> │         │
 │  Data  ├──> Worker 1 ───> │  Queue  ├──> Worker 3 ───> │  Queue  ├───> Output
 │        ├──> Worker 1 ───> │         ├──> Worker 3 ───> │         │
 ╰────────╯                  ╰─────────╯                  ╰─────────╯ 
 ╭────────╮                     ^ ^ ^
 │        ├──> Worker 2 ────────┘ │ │
 │  Data  ├──> Worker 2 ──────────┘ │
 │        ├──> Worker 2 ────────────┘
 ╰────────╯                         

Before I roll out my own generic solution, are there any existing libraries (or clean multiprocessing / threading examples) that I could use? I'm not sure what to call this sort of setup, so my Google searches haven't given me many useful results.

Any tips are appreciated!

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Is there any performance benefit of this structure of pools? –  Narendra Pathai Jan 19 '13 at 12:41
    
@NarendraPathai: I'm gathering data from multiple sources, processing it, and then writing it to disk. There doesn't really seem to be any other way of doing it. –  Blender Jan 19 '13 at 12:43
    
are you writing the output to multiple files or a single one? –  Narendra Pathai Jan 19 '13 at 12:47
    
@NarendraPathai: It doesn't makes much of a difference. I'm just looking for a generic framework that lets me plug stuff together like this. –  Blender Jan 19 '13 at 12:50
    
BTW looks like exactly the type of problem Go was created for. –  9000 Jan 19 '13 at 14:59

2 Answers 2

ZeroMQ is a lightweight solution and has Python bindings. http://www.zeromq.org/bindings:python

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I've looked at Beanstalkd before which is great at dealing with worker queues with multi processors being producer and/or consumers, saves having to worry about threading.

There's a Python client at beanstalkc

Example taken from their wiki.

>>> import beanstalkc
>>> beanstalk = beanstalkc.Connection(host='localhost', port=14711)
>>> beanstalk.put('hey!')
1
>>> job = beanstalk.reserve()
>>> job.body
'hey!'
>>> job.delete()

This might suite your needs - IIRC you can have durable queues as well.

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