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i have multiple occurrences of a key in a sorted array, and i want to perform binary search on them, a normal binary search returns some random index for the key having multiple occurrences, where as i want the index of the last occurrence of that key.

int data[] = [1,2,3,4,4,4,4,5,5,6,6];
int key = 4;
int index = upperBoundBinarySearch(data, 0, data.length-1, key);

Index Returned = 6
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6  
Java and C++ are different languages, which are you interested in? –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 19 '13 at 14:35
    
Is int data[] = [1,2,3,4,4,4,4,5,5,6,6]; correct in Java? I don't think so. –  Nawaz Jan 19 '13 at 14:36
1  
For C++, there are many standard algorithms you could try. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 19 '13 at 14:38
    
In general the same question: first-occurrence-in-a-binary-search –  MrSmith42 Jan 19 '13 at 15:11
1  
yes, its java syntax, its better to be in java –  Rizwan Yasin Jan 19 '13 at 19:47

5 Answers 5

Presumably you want an O(log N) solution? (Otherwise you could just do a linear search.)

In C++, one possibility (out of several), is to use std::upper_bound. This will give you an iterator to the first element greater than what you asked for, so then you need to check the previous element. This is indeed O(log N).

I don't know if Java offers this a standard library method. However, the pseudocode for upper_bound is given in the link above, and should be easy enough to reimplement.

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yes, i tried to convert that upper_bound in java, but it always gives me the upper_bound_index+1, and have some issue with my conversion, any how i have 10K entries in array, and i want the upper and lower index of same key having multiple occurrences, with some better solution than linear, binary will work fine with me as it provides me atleast O(log2N) solution –  Rizwan Yasin Jan 19 '13 at 19:52

The Java implementation in this answer finds the first occurrence of a key. There's a comment about how this could be changed to find the last occurrence, but the suggestion results in an infinite loop. The idea seems sound, though.

EDIT: After some research, I found a neat solution on The Algo Blog. Since the first found match is not necessarily the needed one, you need to keep track of the "best" match so far. When you do get a match, you store it and continue with the binary search on the right of that match (low = mid + 1).

public static int binarySearch(int[] a, int key) {
    return binarySearch(a, 0, a.length, key);
}

private static int binarySearch(int[] a, int fromIndex, int toIndex,
        int key) {
    int low = fromIndex;
    int high = toIndex - 1;
    int found = -1;

    while (low <= high) {
        int mid = (low + high) >>> 1;
        int midVal = a[mid];

        if (midVal < key) {
            low = mid + 1;
        } else if (midVal > key) {
            high = mid - 1;
        } else {
            found = mid;
            // For last occurrence:
            low = mid + 1;
            // For first occurrence:
            // high = mid - 1;
        }
    }
    return found;
}

This change keeps the O(log n) complexity. Still, the actual performance depends on the application. When the length of the array is much larger than the amount of duplications of the sought key, a linear search for the last occurrence may be faster. When there are a lot of duplications though, this modified binary search is probably preferable.

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That is a clever idea. –  MrSmith42 Jan 19 '13 at 15:04
    
I found a working solution, updated my answer. –  Mattias Buelens Jan 19 '13 at 15:17
    
+1 for the idea, slight modification to the last line of code could return the so called insertion point : return (found != - 1) ? found : -(low + 1); –  Shmil The Cat Apr 20 at 11:43

When you find the key. instead of returning it do sequential search on the array to get the last one. This will be O(N) solution.

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that will not fit for me, anyways thanks –  Rizwan Yasin Jan 19 '13 at 19:54
    
what is your desired complexity? You can do some play inside. let me know your constraints –  blackmath Jan 20 '13 at 15:09
    
@RizwanYasin This is a decent solution. The complexity is not O(n), but O(log n + k) –  nawfal Jun 16 at 4:55
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, thanks to all especially @Mattias, that algo sounds good. anyway i have done with my own, that seem me to give better result, but if some one can help me to measure out the complexity of both algos mine and @Mattias, or any one has some better solution, it welcome..... anyhow here is the solution i found for the problem,

int upperBound(int[] array,int fromIndex, int toIndex, int key)
{
    int low = fromIndex-1, high = toIndex;
    while (low+1 != high)
    {
        int mid = (low+high)>>>1;
        if (array[mid]> key) high=mid;
        else low=mid;
    }
    int p = low;
    if ( p >= toIndex || array[p] != key )
        p=-1;//no key found
    return p;
}

this is for first occurrence, i also update the same with one other similar post First occurrence in a binary search

int lowerBound(int[] array,int fromIndex, int toIndex, int key)
{
    int low = fromIndex-1, high = toIndex;
    while (low+1 != high)
    {
        int mid = (low+high)>>>1;
        if (array[mid]< key) low=mid;
        else high=mid;
    }
    int p = high;
    if ( p >= toIndex || array[p] != key )
        p=-1;//no key found
    return p;
}
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1  
So basically, you took Bentley's method from that article and slightly rewrote it to find the last occurrence instead of the first? Nice work, although I have to agree with the author of that article: I also find that algorithm to be trickier and harder to understand. For example, I don't see when and how the final check for 'no key found' is needed. –  Mattias Buelens Jan 19 '13 at 20:11
    
yes, i found the algo for lower index from bentley's, and i just slightly modify it to suite my needs. yes its little trickier, in case of lowere index, it store the last matched in high variable in loop, but at the end it ensures that the last store value was actually a match, as it store in both cases >= –  Rizwan Yasin Jan 19 '13 at 20:25
    
@MattiasBuelens that final check is needed. Think of cases when array is empty. –  nawfal Jun 16 at 4:53

In the binary search you compare your key to elements of the array data[i]. To get the last matching index you should change your compare function so that it gives inequality even if key is equal to data[i] and also to data[i+1].

int upperBoundBinarySearch(int data[],int start, int end, int key) {
  while(start < end) {
    int middle = start + (end-start)/2;
    if (data[middle] == key && (middle == end || data[middle+1] != key))
      return middle;
    if (data[middle] > key)
      end = middle;
    else {
      if (start == middle)
        return start;
      start = middle;
    }
  }
  return start;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work, and isn't even possible with the majority of search frameworks. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 19 '13 at 14:54
    
added working snippet... –  Emanuele Paolini Jan 20 '13 at 14:49

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