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#include<stdio.h>

typedef struct Node
{
        int data;
        struct Node *next;
        struct Node *prev;
} node;

void insert(node *pointer, int data)
{
        while(pointer->next!=NULL)
        {
                pointer = pointer -> next;
        }
        pointer->next = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
        (pointer->next)->prev = pointer;
        pointer = pointer->next;
        pointer->data = data;
        pointer->next = NULL;
}

int main()
{
        node *start;
        start = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
        int data;
        scanf("%d",&data);
        insert(start,data);
}

Well, I'm trying to understand the basics of lists in C. I have one question here - the 3rd line from the insert()'s bottom - what is this for? It seems like if the first list's element remains empty and the data is being saved into the second one. But only this works.

In main() there's being created first empty element, right?

while() is not executed as the element is null.

Then the second element is being created. (pointer->null)

Pointer pointing to the first element is set to point to the second element (that 3rd line from the bottom)

And the data is being saved to that second element.

Where do I make a mistake?

share|improve this question
1  
This actually is Undefined behavior unless I am much mistaken, first time next would be uninitialized.. –  Karthik T Jan 19 '13 at 15:35
    
And yes it does look like the data is stored in the 2nd element, what is the question exactly? –  Karthik T Jan 19 '13 at 15:36
2  
What is your question ? Your analysis is correct. –  AsheeshR Jan 19 '13 at 15:43

2 Answers 2

pointer = pointer->next;

This line changes the current node we're concentrating on from the last node of the original list to the newly allocated last node of the new list (i.e. the node after the last node of the original list). We then set that node's values directly in the next two lines.

You could get rid of this line and change the two lines below it to read

pointer->next->data = data;
pointer->next->next = NULL;

and you would have the same result.

Edit: Looking further into things, I see more issues:

1) You need #include <stdlib.h> to use malloc().
2) You need to explicitly set start->next = NULL; before you call insert().

share|improve this answer

In your insert function, you have this assignment:

pointer = pointer->next;

This will not work, as the pointer pointer is passed by value. This means that all changes to the value will be lost when the function returns.

You can pass the pointer by reference:

void insert(node **pointer, int data)
{
    /* ... */
    *pointer = (*pointer)->next;
    /* ... */
}

Or return the pointer from the function:

node *insert(node *pointer, int data)
{
    /* ... */
    return pointer;
}


There is also the problem that you don't initialize the pointers in the node structure. This means that when you allocate a node structure, the fields in it will be pointing to seemingly random locations.

This is solved simply by setting the next and prev pointer to NULL directly after allocation:

start = malloc(sizeof(node));
start->next = NULL;
start->prev = NULL;
share|improve this answer
2  
Dont think pointer was meant to be persisted –  Karthik T Jan 19 '13 at 15:37
1  
... as the pointer pointer is passed by value. This means that all changes to the value will be lost when the function returns. That is the idea. pointer is just being used to traverse the list, reach the last element and add a new element with data. –  AsheeshR Jan 19 '13 at 15:39

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