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Background

I am building a quadcopter on each arm of which I have placed a strip of RGB addressable LEDs. I am using an Arduino to drive the lights and the Arduino code is C++, a language I don't know very well.

Here is the first StackOverflow question I posted regarding a previous problem I had with this code. It gives you more background about what exactly I am trying to do (if you are interested).

Problem

I have now properly written the array "gpsHoldArr" thanks to the answers to my first question, but I am having trouble accessing it's values.

In the code below, I call toggleLights(gpsHoldArr[x][y]) and pass in a subarray of gpsHoldArr. The subarray should be the result of pointing to a given LED strip ([x]) and then a given step ([y]).

toggleLights should then iterate the array it is passed and send the value of each LED (some number from 1-6) it is on and that LED's red, green, and blue value to the console.

Unfortunately, when I run the code below, I get this error: cannot convert int(*)[3] to int* for argument 1 to 'void toggleLights(int*)'

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Here's the current code:

//4 arms, 6 steps, 6 leds
int gpsHoldArr[4][6][6][3] = {
  {
    {{255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}}
},
  {
    {{255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}}
},
  {
    {{255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}}
},
  {
    {{255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {0,0,0}},
    {{255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}, {255,0,0}}
}
};

toggleLights(gpsHoldArr[0][0]); //Toggles lights on strip #1, step #1
toggleLights(gpsHoldArr[1][0]); //Toggles lights on strip #2, step #1
toggleLights(gpsHoldArr[2][0]); //Toggles lights on strip #3, step #1
toggleLights(gpsHoldArr[3][0]); //Toggles lights on strip #4, step #1 

void toggleLights(int lights[]){
  for(int i = 0; i <= 6; ++i)
  {
    set_color_led(i, lights[i], lights[i], lights[i]);
  } 
}

void set_color_led(int led, int r, int g, int b){
   Serial.println(led); //Which LED (or "pixel") is it?
   Serial.println(r); //What is the red value?
   Serial.println(g); //What is the green value?
   Serial.println(b); //What is the blue value? 
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't think that toggleLights() is doing what you think it is doing. Its input is a 1-D array, but you are passing it a 2-D array of size [6][3]. When toggleLights(gpsHoldArr[0][0]); is called, the 1-D memory array that the function sees is {255,0,0,0,0,0}, i.e. the first six values in your array. Then, for each of these values you are calling set_color_led(); and passing the same value for multiple arguments. Unrolling the loop in toggleLights(), this translates to

// set_color_led(i, lights[i], lights[i], lights[i]) for i = {0, ..., 6}
set_color_led(0, 255, 255, 255);
set_color_led(1, 0, 0, 0);
set_color_led(2, 0, 0, 0);
set_color_led(3, 0, 0, 0);
set_color_led(4, 0, 0, 0);
set_color_led(5, 0, 0, 0);
set_color_led(6, 0, 0, 0); // bug here as noted by molbdnilo

This is probably not what you want. I would change the definition of toggleLights() to the following:

void toggleLights(int lights[][3]){
  for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++i)
  {
    set_color_led(i, lights[i][0], lights[i][1], lights[i][2]);
  } 
}

In this case when calling toggleLights(gpsHoldArr[0][0]);, the 2-D array that this function see is

{{255,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}, {0,0,0}}

and unrolling the loop in toggleLights(), this translates to the following series of function calls:

// set_color_led(i, lights[i][0], lights[i][1], lights[i][2]) for i = {0, ..., 5}
set_color_led(0, 255, 0, 0);
set_color_led(1, 0, 0, 0);
set_color_led(2, 0, 0, 0);
set_color_led(3, 0, 0, 0);
set_color_led(4, 0, 0, 0);
set_color_led(5, 0, 0, 0);
share|improve this answer
    
All answers were very helpful, but this one was a direct answer to the question and worked. Thanks to all! –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 19 '13 at 19:59
    
I am glad that my answer was helpful to you; sounds like a cool project, and I wish you the best of luck. I would recommend that you try to incorporate molbdnilo's suggestions to make your code more readable, but IMO it is better to get things working first and then iteratively improve while moving from working revision to working revision. –  jstarr Jan 19 '13 at 20:07
    
As an aside, I compiled/ran molbdnilo's code on my desktop (replacing your call to Serial.println with iostream), and it worked on g++ 4.6.3. I am not sure what could be wrong, but make sure that you have copied it exactly. –  jstarr Jan 19 '13 at 20:14

I would probably go about it like this, removing some repetition along the way.
(Macro trickery only because of Arduino - on a desktop I would use classes instead of arrays.)

struct LED { int r, g, b; };

#define BLACK  {0, 0, 0}
#define RED    {255, 0, 0}

#define DEFAULT_LEDS \
  { {RED, BLACK, BLACK, BLACK, BLACK, BLACK},\
    {RED, RED,   BLACK, BLACK, BLACK, BLACK},\
    {RED, RED,   RED,   BLACK, BLACK, BLACK},\
    {RED, RED,   RED,   RED,   BLACK, BLACK},\
    {RED, RED,   RED,   RED,   RED,   BLACK},\
    {RED, RED,   RED,   RED,   RED,   RED}}

LED gpsHoldArr[4][6][6] = {
   DEFAULT_LEDS,
   DEFAULT_LEDS,
   DEFAULT_LEDS,
   DEFAULT_LEDS
};


void set_color_led(int index, const LED& led){
   Serial.println(index); //Which LED (or "pixel") is it?
   Serial.println(led.r); //What is the red value?
   Serial.println(led.g); //What is the green value?
   Serial.println(led.b); //What is the blue value? 
}

void toggleLights(LED (&leds)[6]){
  for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++i)  // You had a '<=' bug here.
  {
    set_color_led(i, leds[i]);
  } 
}

toggleLights(gpsHoldArr[0][0]); //Toggles lights on strip #1, step #1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This will be a GREAT direction for my particular application, but I am having one problem: the call to set_color_led from within toggleLights is erroring out: –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 19 '13 at 18:20
    
cannot convert 'LED' to 'int' for argument '2' to 'void set_color_led(int, int)' –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 19 '13 at 18:21
    
I am so inept with C++. I don't understand why I am getting this error when I don't actually have (int,int) in the set_color_led method signature!? –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 19 '13 at 18:24

You are passing in a 2D array when your function exists a 1D array (decayed to a pointer).

Can I suggest eliminating array dimmensions by making structs/classes, it will make stuff much clearer.

for e.g

struct Led{
    int r,g,b;
};

void toggleLights(Led lights[]){

Led gpsHoldArr[4][6][6] = 

set_color_led(i, lights[i].r, lights[i].g, lights[i].b);

That should be all the changes you need to make, the rest should work as-is.

You can go further and make an arm struct and a step struct as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I appreciate the answer, but am unsure how to correct the code based on this answer. Can you please show me how I would correctly call the function? Again--thanks! –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 19 '13 at 16:31
    
@MatthewPatrickCashatt Please see my edit, Alternatively you could use the error to figure out what changes need to be made to the signature of togglelights function.. –  Karthik T Jan 19 '13 at 16:35
    
Thanks! I am going to give this a go in just a few. C++ is really foreign to me so I really appreciate the help. Will let you know how it works out. –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 19 '13 at 16:50
    
s/exists/expects/? –  FredOverflow Jan 19 '13 at 19:49

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