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this is my first question here, but i hope i will provide all the needed information.
If NOT, please let me know!

My Problem:
I tried to improve my backtracking-algorithm by adding a HashMap to store the already processed results. For this i created a own class for the key of that HashMap. In there i overwrote the .equals()- and .hashCode()- methods.
But if i try to put this key and it's value into the map, it is taking much time, so that the algorithm becomes even less efficient then the backtrack-algorithm without the map.
To solve that problem, i changed the HashMap-Key to String and addded a .toString()-method to my key-class. This works very fine and it is quite fast. (Strange thing: .toString().hashCode() produces a lot of negative values, but seems to work)

Now my Question:
Is it always slowing down that much, if you create your own key?
I tried to find a answer to that question on my own and the only thin i found was to change .hashCode() or playing with the parameters of the HashMap-Constructor.
I tried both and i exported the produced HashCodes for my test-environment and i did not find any duplicates, though i know, it isn't a "good" method for hash-codes!

Here is a copy of my HashKey-Class (names of variables and methods changed):

public class HashKey {
    private final int int0, int1, int2;

    public HashKey(int int0, int int1, int int2) {
        this.int0 = int0;
        this.int1 = int1;
        this.int2 = int2;
    }

    public int getInt0() {
        return this.int0;
    }

    public int getInt1() {
        return this.int1;
    }

    public int getInt2() {
        return this.int2;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime1 = 107;
        final int prime2 = 227;
        final int prime3 = 499;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime1 * result + this.int2;
        result = prime2 * result + this.int1;
        result = prime3 * result + this.int0;
        return result;
     }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Int0: " + this.int0 + " Int1: " + int1 + " Int2: " + int2;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (obj instanceof HashKey) {
            boolean eq0, eq1, eq2;
            eq0 = this.int0 == ((HashKey) obj).getInt0();
            eq1 = this.int1 == ((HashKey) obj).getInt1();
            eq2 = this.int2 == ((HashKey) obj).getInt2();
            if (eq0 && eq1 && eq2) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
}  

And in my main-Class i use this:

HashMap<HashKey, List<Object>> storedResults = new HashMap<HashKey, List<Object>>();  

int x1,x2,x3;  
Object obj;  

// later in a method:

storedResults.put(new HashKey(x1,x2,x3), obj);

If i change the Type of the Key to String and put that String into the Map, it works fine! So the HashKey.hashCode()-method and the rest of the algorithm works fine and is quite fast.

Does anybody know, what i can do to use this HashKey? For this algorithm it is not that important, but i want to know it for future algorithms!

If there are any questions or critics: they are VERY welcome!

Thanks in advance!

Klumbe

share|improve this question
    
Thanks for your comment, but that won't make any (big) difference, i think. The thing is, that i want to keep these values to reuse them in a different part of the algorithm. I could use a second Map or something like that to store it, but it would be much more effort! And i think it should work somehow and i just made a mistake i can not see :-\ –  Klumbe Jan 19 '13 at 16:57
    
It will make a huge difference. When storing into a Set, the hash code is always calculated first. Only if two instances have different hash codes, .equals() will be called. –  fge Jan 19 '13 at 16:59
    
@Klumbe Seems that you have bug in your equals method: eq2 = this.int1 == ((HashKey) obj).getInt2(); (should start with eq2 = this.int**2**) –  stacker Jan 19 '13 at 17:02
    
You could also use a static factory method, but this would be impractical if you really have a lot of values. –  fge Jan 19 '13 at 17:07
    
@Stacker: thanks, but that was just a mistake copying the code! sorry for that! –  Klumbe Jan 19 '13 at 17:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this: Simplyfy your equals(..)-method and do not calculate the hashCode more than once.

public final class HashKey {
    private final int int0, int1, int2;
    private final int hashCode;

    public HashKey(int int0, int int1, int int2) {
        this.int0 = int0;
        this.int1 = int1;
        this.int2 = int2;
        hashCode=107*int0+227*int1+499*int2;
    }

    @Override
    public final int hashCode() {
        return hashCode;
    }

    @Override
    public final boolean equals( finalObject obj) {
        if (!obj instanceof HashKey)
            retun false;
        HashKey other = (HashKey)obj;
        return int0 == other.int0 && int1 == other.int1 &&  int2 == other.int2;
    }
}  

Referring to the comment of fge I changed the code.

share|improve this answer
    
This implementation violates the .equals contract! –  fge Jan 19 '13 at 17:08
    
@fge: You are right, but the missing instanceof check would be no problem in this use case. What so ever, I added the instanceof check. –  MrSmith42 Jan 19 '13 at 17:11
    
I think that was it! i can not believe, that the equals-method was this bad, but it was! Changing the hashCode()-method didn't help, but i think it is a further improvement! THANK YOU VERY MUCH! –  Klumbe Jan 19 '13 at 17:30

Your class is nearly immutable: all your instance members are final, just the class itself would also need to be.

But as all your instance members are final, you could as well calculate the hash code at build time:

// Add as member:
private final int hashCode;

public HashKey(int int0, int int1, int int2) {
    this.int0 = int0;
    this.int1 = int1;
    this.int2 = int2;
    hashCode = // calculate hash code here
}

public int hashCode()
{
    return hashCode;
}

By the way, negative hash codes are nothing to worry about. .hashCode() returns an int, after all.

share|improve this answer
    
Big thanks for your comment (especially the "don't worry"-part ;-) )! It is immuatable, yes, but i am interested in reading these values! To store the hashCode is a good idea to make thinks faster i think! I will try if it will improve it enough! –  Klumbe Jan 19 '13 at 16:59

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