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I'm working on a function that takes in a list of structures and then using that list of structures produces a function that processes a list of symbols into a number. Each structure is made up of a symbol, that will be in the second list consumed, and a number. This function produced has to turn the list of symbols into a number by assigning each symbol a value based on the previous structures. Using abstract list functions btw.

    Example: ((function (list (make-value 'value1 10) (make-value 'value2 20)))
              (list 'value1 'value2 'nothing 'value1)) would produced 40.

Heres my code but it only works for specific cases.

 (define (function lst)
   (lambda (x) (foldr + 0 (map (lambda (x) 
                           (cond
                             [(equal? x (value-name(first lst)))(value-value (first  lst))]
                             [else (value-value (second lst))]))

                             (filter (lambda (x) (member? x (map value-name lst)))x)))))
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2 Answers 2

Looks like a homework. Basic shape of your solution is ok. I think the reason you have a problem here is that there is no decomposition in your code so it's easy to get lost in parentheses.

Let's start with your idea of fold-ing with + over list of integers as a last step of computation.

For this subtask you have:

1) a list of (name, value) pairs 2) a list of names

and you need to get a list of values. Write a separate function which does exactly that and use it. Like this

(define (function lst)
   (lambda (x) (foldr + 
                      0 
                      (to-values x lst)))

(define (to-values names names-to-values)
   (map (lambda (name) 
            (to-value name names-to-values))))

(define (to-value n ns-to-vs)
     ...)

Here we map over the names with another little function. It will lookup the n value in ns-to-vs and return it or 0 if there is no one.

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How do I write that last function, I'm still running into my same issue –  user1992460 Jan 19 '13 at 17:56
    
hint: google.com/search?q=racket+findf –  hoha Jan 19 '13 at 18:00
    
Can't use findf –  user1992460 Jan 19 '13 at 18:10
    
Write one then, it's easy. You can use your functions, right? –  hoha Jan 19 '13 at 18:49

There are two approaches for solving the problem with foldr, it'd be interesting to study and understand both of them. The first one, attempted in the question, is to first produce a list with all the values and let foldr take care of adding them. It can be implemented in a simpler way like this:

(define (function lst)
  (lambda (x)
    (foldr +
           0
           (map (lambda (e)
                  (cond ((assoc e lst) => value-value)
                        (else 0)))
                x))))

Alternatively: maybe using foldr is overkill, applying + is simpler:

(define (function lst)
  (lambda (x)
    (apply +
           (map (lambda (e)
                  (cond ((assoc e lst) => value-value)
                        (else 0)))
                x))))

In the second approach we take the input list "as is" and let foldr's lambda perform the addition logic. This is more efficient than the first approach using foldr, because there's no need to create an intermediate list - the one generated by map in the first version:

(define (function lst)
  (lambda (x)
    (foldr (lambda (e a)
             (cond ((assoc e lst) => (lambda (p) (+ a (value-value p))))
                   (else a)))
           0
           x)))

In both approaches I'm using assoc for finding the element in the list; it's easy to implement as a helper function if you're not allowed to use it or if it doesn't work for the values created with make-value: assoc takes a list of name-value pairs and returns the first pair with the given name. The => syntax of cond passes the pair returned by assoc to a lambda's parameter and executes it.

And because you're using Racket, there's a bit of syntactic sugar that can be used for returning a function from another function, try this equivalent code, for simplicity's sake:

(define ((function lst) x)
  (foldr +
         0
         (map (lambda (e)
                (cond ((assoc e lst) => value-value)
                      (else 0)))
              x)))

Or this:

(define ((function lst) x)
  (foldr (lambda (e a)
           (cond ((assoc e lst) => (lambda (p) (+ a (value-value p))))
                 (else a)))
         0
         x))

Anyway, the result is as expected:

((function (list (make-value 'value1 10) (make-value 'value2 20)))
 (list 'value1 'value2 'nothing 'value1))
=> 40
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