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I have a List li of elements that I used .toArray(). I now need to loop through them to find the desired element and change its style Class.

I am not sure what I am doing wrong, but I cannot seem to get the class of the index item, but I can retrieve the innerHTML no problem.

var viewsIndex = $('#viewsList li').toArray()
        for(i=0; i < viewsIndex.length; i++) {
            if(viewsIndex[i].innerHTML == selectedTab) {

                console.log(viewsIndex[i].attr('style')); //This does NOT work
                console.log(viewsIndex[i].innerHTML); //This does work
            }
            else
            {


            }
        }

Once I target the Element, I want to use .removeClass and .addClass to change the style.

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4 Answers 4

This is the DOM object which doesn't have jQuery functions:

viewsIndex[i]

This is the jQuery object which has the attr function:

$(viewsIndex[i]).attr('style')

Anyway, your code could be a lot simpler with this:

$('#viewsList li').filter(function(){
    return this.innerHTML == selectedTab;
}).removeClass('foo').addClass('bar');
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Please use $(this).html() :-). jQuery doesn't normalize everything for you to use innerHTML :P –  Florian Margaine Jan 19 '13 at 17:32
    
that worked. thank you –  Rob Jan 19 '13 at 17:34
1  
@FlorianMargaine, this is so wrong, jQuery wasn't meant to replace javascript(as it is javascript...), it helps you doing things easier, if you are over using jQuery- meaning you're using verbose jQuery functions instead of using js native functions, you're doing something wrong. jQuery- write less do more, isn't it? please read the "Know Your DOM Properties and Functions" –  gdoron Jan 19 '13 at 17:35
    
Dude. innerHTML works differently across browsers. jQuery normalizes everything for you. If you're using jQuery, at least use it when necessary --- this case is a necessary one. –  Florian Margaine Jan 19 '13 at 18:12
1  
@gdoron with that logic why wrap the element to use .attr() when .getAttribute() is faster, well supported and not overly verbose in comparison to the jQuery method. –  rlemon Jan 19 '13 at 18:23

You are trying to call jQuery function on DOM object convert it to jQuery object first.

Change

viewsIndex[i].attr('style')

To

$(viewsIndex[i]).attr('style')
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I just tried var $item = viewsIndex[i]; console.log($item.attr('style')); with no luck. –  Rob Jan 19 '13 at 17:30
    
@Rob, well... This isn't the code he wrote in his answer... anyway, you're doing it wrong, use the filter function. –  gdoron Jan 19 '13 at 17:31
    
You did not convert the element to jQuery object try this, var $item = $(viewsIndex[i]); console.log($item.attr('style')); –  Adil Jan 19 '13 at 17:32
    
Just saw that error on my part. thanks for the quick responses –  Rob Jan 19 '13 at 17:34

couldn't you use .each()?

$('#viewLists li').each(function(i){
    if($(this).html == selectedTab){
       $(this).removeClass('foo').addClass('bar');
    }
});
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Loop over the elements using jQuery each and then access them as $(this). This way you'll have access to jQuery methods on each item.

$('#viewsList li').each(function(){

    var element = $(this);

    if(element.html() == selectedTab){
        console.log(element.attr('style')
    } else {

    }
}
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