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Let's say you have a project called proj and in this project you have the following structure:

proj/
  dists/
  doc/
  src/
    __init__.py
    xyz.py
    abc.py
  test/
  setup.py

As you can see all the content of your project is in the src subfolder. How to go about making a distutils distribution package out of the src folder?

My naive idea, following the tutorial, would've been to write the setup.py like this:

#omitting basics
setup(
   name='proj',
   packages=['src'],
   package_dir={'proj':'src'}
)

But after installing the resulting package to my system, I still have to import src.xyz and not proj.xyz, which would've been the goal and the expected result.

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2 Answers 2

You could fix it by putting Python package files into proj/ directory:

proj/
  src/
    proj/
      __init__.py
      xyz.py
      abc.py
  setup.py

And changing setup.py to:

# ...
setup(
   name='proj',
   packages=['proj'],
   package_dir={'':'src'}
)

It is not required by distutils but other tools might expect the parent directory name of __init__.py file to be the same as Python package name i.e., proj in this case.

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I did that and it works. Not sure if I understand your last comment, though. You mean there are tools that expect me to have a folder structure like proj/src/proj to work as expected? Seems so inefficient. Or am I doing something inefficient here? –  erikb85 Jan 20 '13 at 20:58
    
I meant that the directory name: <name>/__init__.py should be the same as Python package name i.e., if I see __init__.py then just by looking at its parent directory name I know what Python package it is. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 20 '13 at 21:18

You can try adding the src folder to the PYTHONPATH before you call the setup function:

import sys, os
src_path = os.path.join(os.path.realpath(os.path.dirname(__file__)), 'src')
sys.path.append(src_path)

And also, just to be on the safe side, you then change the working directory:

os.chdir(src_path)

After that, it should all be OK.

Some other tools for packaging your app support that from within. I thought it was setuptools, turns out it's PyInstaller. But basically, that's what should be done, just enough for your packages to be imported directly.

Turns out distutils has the package_dir directive. That is what you should use, but it might work by only adding your package to the PYTHONPATH.

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I'm not sure you got the problem yet. I'm trying to write a python package that other people can install by themself easily. It's not just about importing stuff you wrote in another folder. –  erikb85 Jan 20 '13 at 20:56
    
Yes I understand, but the setup.py has to import stuff in another folder in order to work. Once these packages are in your PYTHONPATH, it doesn't matter where they are. If it did not work for you, you'll have to see another way, sorry. –  jadkik94 Jan 21 '13 at 12:44
    
Sorry, but that's not the problem. –  erikb85 Jan 21 '13 at 18:34

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