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I have a simple user factory that looks like this:

FactoryGirl.define do
  factory :user do
    name "jeff"
    email "jeff@lint.com"
    password "foobar"
    password_confirmation "foobar"
  end
end

And I am trying to test the built in authenticate method like so:

  describe "return value of authenticate method", focus: true do

    before do
      create(:user)
    end

    let(:found_user) { User.find_by_email(:email) }

    it "can return value of authenticate method" do
      expect(:user).to eq found_user.authenticate(:password)
    end

  end

The error I am getting is

NoMethodError:
       undefined method `authenticate' for nil:NilClass

That probably means found_user is returning nil. But I don't understand why. When I try this code on the console, it works just fine. So what am I doing wrong? I am quite new to Factory Girl.

What I am also looking for is to get this right without using instance variables.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this

describe "return value of authenticate method", focus: true do

   before do
     @user = FactoryGirl.create(:user)
   end

   let(:found_user) { User.find_by_email(@user.email) }

   it "can return value of authenticate method" do  
     expect(@user).to eq found_user.authenticate(@user.password)
   end
end
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This works but I want to know why using just (:user) doesn't work. –  Amit Erandole Jan 19 '13 at 19:26
1  
Because you assigned the values of the :user factory to @user. It's like a class. You have to instantiate it first. –  Victor Solis Jan 19 '13 at 19:28
    
So what exactly is returned by the user factory? Isn't it the same kind of object such as @user? –  Amit Erandole Jan 19 '13 at 19:29
    
Isn't there a way to do all this without instance variables? –  Amit Erandole Jan 19 '13 at 19:31
1  
The reason you assign factories to instance variables is so that you can DRY up your code. For example, you can use @user on multiple "it" blocks within your "describe" declaring it only once. –  Victor Solis Jan 19 '13 at 19:53
show 3 more comments
  describe "return value of authenticate method", focus: true do

    before do
      @user = FactoryGirl.create(:user)
    end

    let(:found_user) { User.find_by_email(@user.email) }

    it "can return value of authenticate method" do
      expect(:user).to eq found_user.authenticate(:password)
    end

  end

Someone can suggest a better RSpec way of doing this, but it will get your test to work.

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When I try this, I get Failure/Error: expect(:user).to eq found_user.authenticate(:password) expected: false got: :user –  Amit Erandole Jan 19 '13 at 19:14
    
This line is wrong expect(:user).to eq found_user.authenticate(:password). You need to pass meaningful values to expect and to authenticate, not just symbols. –  dwhalen Jan 19 '13 at 19:23
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