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I need to convert a (possibly) null terminated array of ascii bytes to a string in C# and the fastest way I've found to do it is by using my UnsafeAsciiBytesToString method shown below. This method uses the String.String(sbyte*) constructor which contains a warning in it's remarks:

"The value parameter is assumed to point to an array representing a string encoded using the default ANSI code page (that is, the encoding method specified by Encoding.Default).

Note: * Because the default ANSI code page is system-dependent, the string created by this constructor from identical signed byte arrays may differ on different systems. * ...

* If the specified array is not null-terminated, the behavior of this constructor is system dependent. For example, such a situation might cause an access violation. * "

Now, I'm positive that the way the string is encoded will never change... but the default codepage on the system that my app is running on might change. So, is there any reason that I shouldn't run screaming from using String.String(sbyte*) for this purpose?

using System;
using System.Text;

namespace FastAsciiBytesToString
{
    static class StringEx
    {
    	public static string AsciiBytesToString(this byte[] buffer, int offset, int maxLength)
    	{
    		int maxIndex = offset + maxLength;

    		for( int i = offset; i < maxIndex; i++ )
    		{
    			/// Skip non-nulls.
    		    if( buffer[i] != 0 ) continue;
    		    /// First null we find, return the string.
    		    return Encoding.ASCII.GetString(buffer, offset, i - offset);
    		}
    		/// Terminating null not found. Convert the entire section from offset to maxLength.
    		return Encoding.ASCII.GetString(buffer, offset, maxLength);
    	}

    	public static string UnsafeAsciiBytesToString(this byte[] buffer, int offset)
    	{
    		string result = null;

    		unsafe
    		{
    			fixed( byte* pAscii = &buffer[offset] )
    			{ 
    				result = new String((sbyte*)pAscii);
    			}
    		}

    		return result;
    	}
    }

    class Program
    {
    	static void Main(string[] args)
    	{
    		byte[] asciiBytes = new byte[]{ 0, 0, 0, (byte)'a', (byte)'b', (byte)'c', 0, 0, 0 };

    		string result = asciiBytes.AsciiBytesToString(3, 6);

    		Console.WriteLine("AsciiBytesToString Result: \"{0}\"", result);

    		result = asciiBytes.UnsafeAsciiBytesToString(3);

    		Console.WriteLine("UnsafeAsciiBytesToString Result: \"{0}\"", result);

    		/// Non-null terminated test.
    		asciiBytes = new byte[]{ 0, 0, 0, (byte)'a', (byte)'b', (byte)'c' };

    		result = asciiBytes.UnsafeAsciiBytesToString(3);

    		Console.WriteLine("UnsafeAsciiBytesToString Result: \"{0}\"", result);

    		Console.ReadLine();
    	}
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Whoops, just realized something...there's no way for me to specify a max length when using String.String(sbyte*) which basically means death to using the constructor for the purpose of reading out of a ring-buffer since it could keep reading past the max length into the next segment! –  Wayne Bloss Sep 27 '08 at 18:20

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Any reason not to use String(sbyte*, int, int)? That would avoid the issue of it potentially not being null-terminated. Probably along the lines of:

public static string UnsafeAsciiBytesToString(this byte[] buffer, int offset)
{
    string result = null;

    unsafe
    {
       fixed( byte* pAscii = &buffer)
       { 
           result = new String((sbyte*)pAscii, offset, buffer.Length - offset);
       }
    }

    return result;
}

If this truly is an ASCII string (i.e. all bytes are less than 128) then the codepage problem shouldn't be an issue unless you've got a particularly strange default codepage which isn't based on ASCII.

Out of interest, have you actually profiled your application to make sure that this is really the bottleneck? Do you definitely need the absolute fastest conversion, instead of one which is more readable (e.g. using Encoding.GetString for the appropriate encoding)?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. I did not use String(sbyte*, int, int) because it does not stop at the first null that it finds, instead it converts every null to a space just like Encoding.ASCII.GetString(). –  Wayne Bloss Sep 27 '08 at 18:29
2  
Oh, also it's not a bottleneck or anything. I'm just a nerd with nothing better to do on the weekend :) –  Wayne Bloss Sep 27 '08 at 18:30
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace TestProject1
{
    class Class1
    {
    static public string cstr_to_string( byte[] data, int code_page)
    {
        Encoding Enc = Encoding.GetEncoding(code_page);  
        int inx = Array.FindIndex(data, 0, (x) => x == 0);//search for 0
        if (inx >= 0)
          return (Enc.GetString(data, 0, inx));
        else 
          return (Enc.GetString(data)); 
    }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, just what I needed. I suspect for a lot of legacy apps like mine, code page will be 1252, and this will be exactly what they need. –  eselk May 31 '13 at 21:10

Oneliner (assuming the buffer actually contains ONE well formatted null terminated string):

String MyString = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(MyByteBuffer).TrimEnd((Char)0);
share|improve this answer

One possibility to consider: check that the default code-page is acceptable and use that information to select the conversion mechanism at run-time.

This could also take into account whether the string is in fact null-terminated, but once you've done that, of course, the speed gains my vanish.

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I'm not sure of the speed, but I found it easiest to use LINQ to remove the nulls before encoding:

string s = myEncoding.GetString(bytes.TakeWhile(b => !b.Equals(0)).ToArray());
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This is a bit ugly but you don't have to use unsafe code:

string result = "";
for (int i = 0; i < data.Length && data[i] != 0; i++)
   result += (char)data[i];
share|improve this answer
1  
This is extremely slow since it's creating a new string instance for every character. Coincidentally, I have made this exact same code before and this was happened to be my bottleneck (and the strings were at most 255 characters in length!) This is definitely not what the OP wants in terms of speed. –  Marlon Jan 21 '12 at 8:54
s = s.Substring(0, s.IndexOf((char) 0));
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An easy / safe / fast way to convert byte[] objects to strings containing their ASCII equivalent and vice versa using the .NET class System.Text.Encoding. The class has a static function that returns an ASCII encoder:

From String to byte[]:

string s = "Hello World!"
byte[] b = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(s);

From byte[] to string:

byte[] byteArray = new byte[] {0x41, 0x42, 0x09, 0x00, 0x255};
string s = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(byteArray);
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