Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a string array in C# like so:

string[] sites = new string[] {
    "http://foobar.com",
    "http://asdaff.com",
    "http://etc.com"
};

I'm using this array in a foreach and I would like to be able to add a "type" value of 1, 2, or 3, depending on which site I am currently iterating through. I am concatenating data with the StringBuilder from these sites. Now, I could store the site as a varchar, but it would be really neat, since this array will NEVER change to associate a number with the string and build it that way.

share|improve this question
1  
Where do you get the "type" value, and for what do you want to use it? –  minitech Jan 19 '13 at 18:52
    
I am using sharpSVN to get svn data, but I wanted to be able to associate an int value for each of our repos. Essentially, I want SVN data to be automatically inserted in our db using a nightly console app, which we can use on our site to track recent codebase changes. I could just add in the site associated with a varchar, but I thought it would be cool to associate just an int in sql server to identify which site so I could do nifty filtering on the front end if people only want to see changes on "svn://foo/trunk". I think a dictionary will be perfect in this situation! –  Chris Jenkins Jan 19 '13 at 19:07
1  
If you're associating an int to a string in a Dictionary, you're pretty much setting up an array that'll have bad lookup performance, by the sounds of it. Provided your array doesn't change order, just index the array, and iterate with the index using a for loop. That's what arrays are for. –  minitech Jan 19 '13 at 19:11
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a dictionary for this - Dictionary<int, string> (or Dictionary<string, int>).

var sitesWithId = new Dictionary<string, int>
{
  new { "http://foobar.com", 1},
  new { "http://asdaff.com", 2},
  new { "http://etc.com", 3}
}

Another option is to just use a List<string> and IndexOf to find out the index.

var sites = new List<string> {
    "http://foobar.com",
    "http://asdaff.com",
    "http://etc.com"
};

var foobarIndex = sites.IndexOf("http://foobar.com");

A third option, using the static IndexOf methods of Array and not changing your array at all:

var foobarIndex = Array.IndexOf(sites, "http://foobar.com");
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! A dictionary is exactly what I was looking for! –  Chris Jenkins Jan 19 '13 at 19:04
add comment

Use for loop instead of foreach:

for(int i = 0; i < sites.Length; i++)
{
    // use sites[i]
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

LINQ's Select can be used to project an index onto a collection.

sites.Select((x, n) => new { Site = x, Index = n })
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try with for loop;

for(int i = 0; i < sites.Length; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(sites[i]);
}

using for elements of sites[] array like this;

sites[1]
sites[2]
sites[3]

or you can use Dictionary<TKey, TValue> as Oded suggest.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.