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I'm trying to call some "global/static" variables($agent, $version) inside a class but I don't know how to insert them in the class itself . Basically I declare the class "$myclass = new myClass($agent, $version) but I don't know how to call these variables inside the class (e.g. use them in the getProducts function ). I know the questions sounds stupid but I just don't get it .

index.php :

$myclass = new myClass($agent, $version);

$agent = "firefox";
$version = "234";

$catalog = $myClass->$getProducts("http://amazon.com", "red");

myclass.class.php :

class myClass {
    function getXML ($agent, $version) {
        //do something 
        return $
    }

    function getProducts ($url, $color) {
        $product = $this->getXML($agent, $version);
        $catalog =  str_replace("asus", "", $product);
        return $catalog
    }

}
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you should declare the class first class myClass. Then initialize $agent and $version. Only after that you can instantiate it new myClass($agent, $version). But you did the reverse! –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 19 '13 at 19:02
    
Why do you want to use static variables? –  art2 Jan 19 '13 at 19:03
    
Make a constructor for the class and declare/initialize the variables of the class: php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.decon.php –  art2 Jan 19 '13 at 19:05
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I suppose that you do not mean "static" variables but "properties":

class myClass {
    // Declare the properties
    private $agent, $version;

    public function __construct($agent, $version) {
        // Copy the arguments to the class members
        $this->agent = $agent;
        $this->version = $version;
    }

    public function getProducts($url, $color) {
        $product = $this->getXML();
        // ...
    }

    private function getXML() {
        // Use the values stored in $this->agent etc.
        $agent = $this->agent;
        // ...
    }
}

Usage:

$agent = "firefox";
$version = "234";
$instance = new myClass($agent, $version);
$catalog = $instance->getProducts("http://amazon.com", "red");
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I don't know why I understand your answer but didn't understand the PHP doc which provided a similar example –  user1963938 Jan 19 '13 at 20:57
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It doesn't sound like static variables are what you're looking for and are best avoided unless you know what you're doing (they're not really object oriented and not needed at all in PHP 5.3+). From the code that you've provided it looks like your expecting to pass the arguments into the object instantiation (new), so you should create a constructor for the class that accepts the arguments and assigns them to instance variables to be used in the method.

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sounds great but how ? Btw I just want to get the job done not really do any state of the art project. –  user1963938 Jan 19 '13 at 19:12
    
Are you doing an application or school project? If latter, shouldn't you do it by yourself, and learn? ;) Though either way, you should't outsource your work. –  art2 Jan 19 '13 at 19:22
    
I do some work for myself meaning that instead to do it manually I'm trying to automate some tasks (php curl , scarping etc ). I don't understand why is so complicated to pass the arguments into the class. –  user1963938 Jan 19 '13 at 19:28
    
Read the answer of Niko, or just pass them directly like this: $instance = new myClass("Firefox", "1234"); I see no point of using static class variables in this case. Before this, you naturally declare/initialize the variables inside the class. –  art2 Jan 19 '13 at 19:31
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You can declare them using the static keyword.

From http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.static.php :

class Foo
{
    public static $my_static = 'foo';

    public function staticValue() {
        return self::$my_static;
    }
}

print Foo::$my_static . "\n";
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I don't need $my_static = 'foo'; . I need the variables that were declared on the new class (e.g. $myclass = new Foo($a, $b, $c). I need the $a, $b, $c inside the class itself. How can I do that ? –  user1963938 Jan 19 '13 at 19:14
1  
But you need them inside the class, if you are doing OOP. You need to initialize the variables always first! –  art2 Jan 19 '13 at 19:23
    
ok so is it impossible to get a variable that is outside of the class ? I mean isn't possible to pass it to the class itself when I initiate it ? –  user1963938 Jan 19 '13 at 19:29
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This is also wrong:

function getProducts ($url, $color){
  $product = $this->getXML($agent, $version);
  $catalog =  str_replace("asus", "", $product);
  return $catalog
}

You cant pass $agent and $version variables in the getXML method unless you dont either, construct them first, or pass them in your getProducts method.

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