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I'm attempting to load a store catalog into MongoDb (2.2.2) using Node.js (0.8.18) and Mongoose (3.5.4) -- all on Windows 7 64bit. The data set contains roughly 12,500 records. Each data record is a JSON string.

My latest attempt looks like this:

var fs = require('fs');
var odir = process.cwd() + '/file_data/output_data/';
var mongoose = require('mongoose');
var Catalog = require('./models').Catalog;

var conn = mongoose.connect('mongodb://127.0.0.1:27017/sc_store');

exports.main = function(callback){
    var catalogArray = fs.readFileSync(odir + 'pc-out.json','utf8').split('\n');
    var i = 0;

    Catalog.remove({}, function(err){
        while(i < catalogArray.length){
            new Catalog(JSON.parse(catalogArray[i])).save(function(err, doc){
                if(err){
                    console.log(err);
                } else {
                    i++;                    
                }
            });
            if(i === catalogArray.length -1) return callback('database populated');
        }
    });
};

I have had a lot of problems trying to populate the database. Under previous scenarios (and this one), node pegs the processor and eventually runs out of memory. Note that in this scenario, I'm trying to allow Mongoose to save a record, and then iterate to the next record once the record saves.

But the iterator inside of the Mongoose save function never gets incremented. In addition, it never throws any errors. But if I put the iterator (i) outside of the asynchronous call to Mongoose, it will work, provided the number of records that I try to load are not too big (I have successfully loaded 2,000 this way).

So my questions are: Why isn't the iterator inside of the Mongoose save call ever incremented? And, more importantly, what is the best way to load a large data set into MongoDb using Mongoose?

Rob

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

i is your index to where you're pulling input data from in catalogArray, but you're also trying to use it to keep track of how many have been saved which isn't possible. Try tracking them separately like this:

var i = 0;
var saved = 0;
Catalog.remove({}, function(err){
    while(i < catalogArray.length){
        new Catalog(JSON.parse(catalogArray[i])).save(function(err, doc){
            saved++;
            if(err){
                console.log(err);
            } else {
                if(saved === catalogArray.length) {
                    return callback('database populated');
                }
            }
        });
        i++;
    }
});

UPDATE

If you want to add tighter flow control to the process, you can use the async module's forEachLimit function to limit the number of outstanding save operations to whatever you specify. For example, to limit it to one outstanding save at a time:

Catalog.remove({}, function(err){
    async.forEachLimit(catalogArray, 1, function (catalog, cb) {
        new Catalog(JSON.parse(catalog)).save(function (err, doc) {
            if (err) {
                console.log(err);
            }
            cb(err);
        });
    }, function (err) {
        callback('database populated');
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion, but I have already tried this. I'm trying to increment (i) when the record is saved. I'm hoping to make node pause the while loop until the record has been saved. Otherwise, node just slams mongoose and mongoose falls apart. Each of my data records is fairly complex. –  rob_hicks Jan 19 '13 at 19:45
    
@rob_hicks I'm surprised that didn't work, but I added another option that gives you explicit control over how many save operations you allow to be outstanding at a time. –  JohnnyHK Jan 19 '13 at 20:35
    
JohnnyHK, thanks! That worked. I really appreciate your help. I've never worked with the async module. Rob –  rob_hicks Jan 20 '13 at 2:12

Rob,

The short answer:

You created an infinite loop. You're thinking synchronously and with blocking, Javascript functions asynchronously and without blocking. What you are trying to do is like trying to directly turn the feeling of hunger into a sandwich. You can't. The closest thing is you use the feeling of hunger to motivate you to go to the kitchen and make it. Don't try to make Javascript block. It won't work. Now, learn async.forEachLimit. It will work for what you want to do here.

You should probably review asynchronous design patterns and understand what it means on a deeper level. Callbacks are not simply an alternative to return values. They are fundamentally different in how and when they are executed. Here is a good primer: http://cs.brown.edu/courses/csci1680/f12/handouts/async.pdf

The long answer:

There is an underlying problem here, and that is your lack of understanding of what non-blocking IO and asynchronous means. Im not sure if you are breaking into node development, or this is just a one-off project, but if you do plan to continue using node (or any asynchronous language) then it is worth the time to understand the difference between synchronous and asynchronous design patterns, and what motivations there are for them. So, that is why you have a logic error putting the loop invariant increment inside an asynchronous callback which is creating an infinite loop.

In non-computer science, that means that your increment to i will never occur. The reason is because Javascript executes a single block of code to completion before any asynchronous callbacks are called. So in your code, your loop will run over and over, without i ever incrementing. And, in the background, you are storing the same document in mongo over and over. Each iteration of the loop starts sending document with index 0 to mongo, the callback can't fire until your loop ends, and all other code outside the loop runs to completion. So, the callback queues up. But, your loop runs again since i++ is never executed (remember, the callback is queued until your code finishes), inserting record 0 again, queueing another callback to execute AFTER your loop is complete. This goes on and on until your memory is filled with callbacks waiting to inform your infinite loop that document 0 has been inserted millions of times.

In general, there is no way to make Javascript block without doing something really really bad. For example, something paramount to setting your kitchen on fire to fry some eggs for that sandwich I talked about in the "short answer".

My advice is to take advantage of libs like async. https://github.com/caolan/async JohnnyHK mentioned it here, and he was correct for doing so.

share|improve this answer
    
Anthony, thanks the for the instruction. I have read previously the materials you referenced. I'll go read them again. –  rob_hicks Jan 21 '13 at 14:09

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