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I'm trying to convert one of my mid-sized JavaScript APIs from "lots of global variables and functions" into something more akin to the namespace encapsulation as used in jQuery and other well thought-out JavaScript libraries. To effect this, I'm using anonymous functions.

Here's a fragment of the code:

(function(window, undefined) {
    var MyLib = (function() {
        var AbortProgram = true;
        function DisplayAbortProgram() { alert('AbortProgram inside=' + AbortProgram); }
        return { AbortProgram: AbortProgram, DisplayAbortProgram: DisplayAbortProgram }
    } ())
    window.MyLib = MyLib;
})(window);

MyLib.AbortProgram = false;
alert('AbortProgram outside=' + MyLib.AbortProgram);
MyLib.DisplayAbortProgram();

When run, the outside value of AbortProgram is false but the inside value is still true. This post is to confirm the reason why this is happening? I believe it's because that return statement is returning the value of DisplayAbortProgram and not a reference to it. The underlying reason is that JavaScript returns values for primitive types and not references - objects are passed by reference.

I've read up on this and believe there is no way to return a reference to that boolean variable so I'll have to implement a function called SetAbortProgram(value).

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

AbortProgram is hidden by the closure, you can't change it. That's most often the goal of the pattern you use.

What you do with MyLib.AbortProgram = false; isn't changing the existing hidden variable but adding a new AbortProgram variable.

If you want to make AbortProgram modifiable, simplify your code to

var MyLib = {
        AbortProgram: true,
        DisplayAbortProgram: function DisplayAbortProgram() { alert('AbortProgram inside=' + this.AbortProgram); }
};

MyLib.AbortProgram = false;
MyLib.DisplayAbortProgram();

Or else add a setter to your existing code :

(function(window, undefined) {
    var MyLib = (function() {
        var AbortProgram = true;
        function DisplayAbortProgram() { alert('AbortProgram inside=' + AbortProgram); }
        function setAbortProgram(v) {AbortProgram=v}
        return { AbortProgram: AbortProgram, DisplayAbortProgram: DisplayAbortProgram, setAbortProgram:setAbortProgram}
    } ())
    window.MyLib = MyLib;
})(window);

MyLib.setAbortProgram(false);
alert('AbortProgram outside=' + MyLib.AbortProgram);
MyLib.DisplayAbortProgram();
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I've gone for the setter code –  Rob Nicholson Jan 20 '13 at 10:40

You are correct that it is a passed-by-value rather than reference. Create a parameters object. That will be passed by reference:

 var args = { AbortProgram: true };

Pass args around instead of AbortProgram. You can access your boolean via args.AbortProgram.

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The underlying reason is that JavaScript returns values for some primitive types and not references.

Not only some. All primitive types will be passed as values. Only objects are references to their properties.

I've read up on this and believe there is no way to return a reference to that boolean variable so I'll have to implement a function called SetAbortProgram(value).

Yes, if you want to change the variable. Yet, you could just use the property of your object everywhere.

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I've edited the question to remove the "some" in relation to primitives –  Rob Nicholson Jan 20 '13 at 10:41

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