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I always have to check each and every browser to see if my website would work. Is there a website where I can check it with?

Update: I don't really want just screenshots (which what browsershots do), I want to actually test the posting of my script.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You want a web site to check your web site for javascript compatibility? How would you expect it to know how to exercise your interface to trigger the proper interactions? Or are you thinking of it doing some sort of static code analysis? I think you are better off coding against a framework that has solved most of the browser-dependent idiosyncrasies and using it to check for browser capabilities before you use them. jQuery, MooTools, Prototype/Scriptaculous, etc. go a long way in solving these problems for javascript.

Note that you still need to worry about rendering your site, but you already have several answers for how to go about doing that based on web sites. Personally, I just maintain IE/Safari/FF/Opera/Chrome on my workstation and do significant checking in IE/FF and basic checking in Safari/Opera/Chrome.

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Wouldn't something like Selenium help with this? An in-browser testing framework? –  SingleShot Sep 17 '09 at 23:52
    
Selenium could certainly help. I've never used it because I still feel that automated UI testing is too cumbersome to be effective. Most of my UI testing is done while developing a feature and during QA. –  tvanfosson Sep 18 '09 at 10:09

Even when there exist websites that allow you to see a static snapshot of your site in several browsers, you should really test your page on them yourself, because there can be subtle, and not so subtle, bugs and differences that are only apparent when interacting with the webpage.

You can cover yourself quite a lot by testing in

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John Resig recommends checking the Yahoo graded browser support documentation.

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If you write unit tests for your javascript, you could use testswarm http://testswarm.com

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This looks very useful. Can you comment on its reliabilty? –  Andy Sep 17 '09 at 23:48
    
Since JResig wrote a lot of it and uses it to test jQuery now, I would hope that it is fairly reliable (as long as you write the unit tests properly). –  SeanJA Sep 18 '09 at 0:13
    
The site seems to be responding really slowly today however... –  SeanJA Sep 18 '09 at 0:15

There are multiple options:

http://ipinfo.info/netrenderer/

These site will let you run multiple browsers and version without installing. You only need to install a plugin

http://spoon.net/browsers/

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I tried spoons, it saids buffering and it sent me to the download page for IE7 and IE8. –  Strawberry Sep 17 '09 at 23:29
    
Which browser were you using? I think you can install the plugin in IE and Firefox. I have it running in my FF 3.5. –  Ariel Popovsky Sep 18 '09 at 2:15

There are plenty of sites, just Google/Bing for browser compatibility check.

http://browsershots.org/ is a good one.

Although most of them just take a snapshot of the site, you might have to do the manual check for things like menus and dynamic content.

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BrowserShots might do what you want if you can tell by rendering a particular URL whether or not things will work as expected.

In light of your update, you could still use BrowserShots by creating a page which tests each of your scripts and renders 'pass' or 'fail' as its content depending on whether they work or not.

Failing that, Multiple IE is quite useful for running various versions of IE on one PC which can otherwise be problematic.

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