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I'm targeting version 4.0 of the .Net framework. I wrote the following simple code:

public class A
{
    public A()
    {
    }
}

public class B
{
    public B()
    {
    }

    public static implicit operator A(B b)
    {
        return new A();
    }
}

Then I created a generic list:

 var mylist = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeof(A)).GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes).Invoke(new object[]{});

When I want add a new instance of B the following code works:

((IList<A>)mylist).Add(new B());

However if I run the below code the following exception is thrown:

The value "B" is not of type "A" and cannot be used in this generic collection.

Parameter name: value

((IList)mylist).Add(new B());
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1  
What is your question? –  Daniel Kelley Jan 19 '13 at 19:49
    
How can I solve this problem? –  afshin alizadeh Jan 19 '13 at 20:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The implicit conversion happens only in the first Add as you are adding an object of type B to a IList<A>. In the second case, you are adding it to the non-generic IList, which is a collection of objects and the implicit conversion doesn't take place and bombs when the object is actually added to your List<A>

Even this fails:

var mylist = new List<A>();
((IList<A>)mylist).Add(new B());
((IList)mylist).Add(new B())

You can do this, however:

((IList)mylist).Add((A)new B());
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Thanks.But I write this code for test. In real code I get all type by reflection and I can't write Add((A)new B()); –  afshin alizadeh Jan 19 '13 at 20:28

The problem is that when you cast your list to IList<A> and call Add, the compiler (implicitly) adds a cast to your B instance to A. In the second case, IList accepts only an object in the Add method. B is an object, so it's not cast to A. Therefore, when the method tries to add it internally to the underlying data structure, it raises the exception.

You can even test it through this code:

var fails = (A) (object) new B();

Since you ask how to solve the problem (although I don't see the necessity of casting your type to IList in this case), you can just explicitly cast your B to A when adding it. Example:

mylist.Add((A) new B());
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Thanks.But I write this code for test. In real code I get all type by reflection and I can't write Add((A)new B()); –  afshin alizadeh Jan 19 '13 at 20:32
    
@afshinalizadeh I understand. –  Eve Jan 19 '13 at 20:32

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