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I have two related questions -- I'm trying to learn R properly, so I'm doing some homework problems from an R course. They have us writing a function to return a vector of correlations:

example.function <- function(threshold = 0) {
  example.vector <- vector()
  example.vector <- sapply(1:30, function(i) {
    complete.record.count <- # ... counts the complete records in each of the 30 files.
    ## Cutting for space and to avoid giving away answers.
    ## a few lines get the complete records in each 
    ## file and count them. 
    if(complete.record.count > threshold) {
      new.correlation <- cor(complete.record$val1, complete.record$val2)
      print(new.correlation)
      example.vector <- c(new.correlation, example.vector)
    }  
  })
  # more null value handling#
  return(example.vector)
}

As the function runs it prints the correlation value to stdout. The values it prints are accurate to six decimal points. So I know I'm getting a good value for new.correlation. The vector that is returned doesn't include those values. Instead, it is whole numbers in sequence.

> tmp <- example.function()
> head(tmp)
[1] 2 3 4 5 6 7

I can't figure out why sapply is pushing integers into the vector? What am I missing here?

I actually don't understand the core structure, which is more or less:

some.vector <- vector()
some.vector <- sapply(range, function(i) {
  some.vector <- c(new.value,some.vector)
}

that seems awfully un-R-like in its redundancy. Tips?

share|improve this question
    
Nice question with code and all, but I am missing complete.record.count. Are you aware of the str() function? –  Eric Fail Jan 19 '13 at 20:37
    
Would love an explanation of the vote to close. I can't be the only person who is able to print a value but not add it to a vector. –  Amanda Jan 19 '13 at 20:38
    
I think your problem is that you are using example.vector both as your sapply output and as a global variable inside the function being applied. Read the doc for sapply and the example: it is not meant to work that way. I voted to close as I find your question too localized, i.e., unlikely to help any future visitor in its current format. Also if instead of a lengthy and non-reproducible example you had tried to break down your problem to something small, you might have found what you are doing wrong by yourself. –  flodel Jan 19 '13 at 20:43
1  
Yes, the last part is awful, it should just be some.vector <- sapply(range, function(i) {[...]; return(new.value)}. Do not use some.vector anywhere else, especially inside the body of the function to be applied. –  flodel Jan 19 '13 at 20:50
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you use sapply you don't need to create the vector yourself and you don't need to grow it (sapply takes care of all that). You probably want something like this:

example.function <- function(threshold = 0) {
  example.vector <- sapply(1:30, function(i) {
    ## Cutting for space and to avoid giving away answers.
    ## a few lines get the complete records in each 
    ## file and count them. 
    if(complete.record.count > threshold) {
      new.correlation <- cor(complete.record$val1, complete.record$val2)
      }  else {
        new.correlation <- NA   
      }
    new.correlation #return value of anonymous function
  })
  # more null value handling#
  example.vector #return value of example.function
}

However, it is unclear how the index i factors into the anonymous function and the question is not reproducible ...

share|improve this answer
    
this is helpful. I'll rework the example so it is actually reproducible. –  Amanda Jan 19 '13 at 20:50
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