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I'm slightly new to PDO, i know how to select data perfectly fine, my problem is inserting.

$Finalize = $pdo->prepare("INSERT INTO `users` VALUES(`id`,:email,:hashedpassword,:firstname,:lastname,:gender,:bdaymonth,:bdayday,:bdayyear,'".time()."',:username)");
$Finalize->bindValue(':email', $email, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$Finalize->bindValue(':hashedpassword', $hashedPassword, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$Finalize->bindValue(':firstname', $first_name, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$Finalize->bindValue(':lastname', $last_name, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$Finalize->bindValue(':gender', $gender, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$Finalize->bindValue(':bdaymonth', $bday_month, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$Finalize->bindValue(':bdayday', $bday_day, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$Finalize->bindValue(':bdayyear', $bday_year, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$Finalize->bindValue(':bdayday', $username, PDO::PARAM_STR);
if($Finalize->execute() == false){ 
    echo '6';
    die;    
}

What am I doing wrong? This script was just using mysql_query and working fine, so I don't know what i did wrong.

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1  
Why are you inserting `id`? –  eggyal Jan 19 '13 at 20:37
    
The ID Field that's auto incremented. This is something i've always done with mysql_ –  Jake Jan 19 '13 at 20:38
2  
If you're inserting a named column like id, you have to provide a value for it (even if it's a null value).... and you had to do that with mysql_* as well –  Mark Baker Jan 19 '13 at 20:40
    
It's not a pattern with which I'm familiar. It's more usual either to explicitly name the columns into which you are providing data for insertion (and not include the AUTO_INCREMENT column amongst them), or else insert NULL. –  eggyal Jan 19 '13 at 20:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are twice binding values to the ':bdayday' parameter, and are not binding any value to the ':username' parameter:

$Finalize->bindValue(':bdayday', $bday_day, PDO::PARAM_STR);
// [ deletia ]
$Finalize->bindValue(':bdayday', $username, PDO::PARAM_STR);

By default, PDO does not output warnings or throw exceptions when an error occurs: you must instead manually inspect the return value of each function to see whether it succeeded and handle errors appropriately.

You can, however, modify this default behaviour.

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Wow I feel like an idiot. I started getting lazy after typing all of them so i started copying and pasting. -_- The server i'm working on has all errors off anyways, not a good thing for me. But i'll talk to the server owner, my friend, have him enable PDO errors for me. Really need them so i can get used to pdo. –  Jake Jan 19 '13 at 20:43
    
@Jake: If you follow that link, you'll see that it's something you can do from within your own code. –  eggyal Jan 19 '13 at 20:45
    
Ah. Alright, thought it had something to do with php.ini. i'm really in a tired/lazy/stressed mood. Really can't be like this, especially while on one a deadline. lol But thank you. i'll accept the answer when it lets me. –  Jake Jan 19 '13 at 20:47

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