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I've written a RAII wrapper for C function pairs which initialize and release resources and it serves me well for most cases.

#include <GL/glfw.h>
#include <string>
#include <functional>
#include <stdexcept>

template <typename UninitFuncType,
          typename SuccessValueType,
          SuccessValueType successValue>
class RAIIWrapper
{
public:
    template <typename InitFuncType, typename... Args>
    RAIIWrapper(InitFuncType initializer,
                UninitFuncType uninitializer,
                const std::string &errorString,
                const Args&... args) : 
        uninit_func(uninitializer)
    {
        if (successValue != initializer(args...))
            throw std::runtime_error(errorString);
        initialized = true;
    }

    bool isInitialized() const
    {
        return initalized;
    }

    ~RAIIWrapper()
    {
        if (initalized)
            uninit_func();
    }

    // non-copyable
    RAIIWrapper(const RAIIWrapper &) = delete;
    RAIIWrapper& operator=(const RAIIWrapper &) = delete;

private:
    bool initalized = false;
    std::function<UninitFuncType> uninit_func;
};

using GLFWSystem = RAIIWrapper<decltype(glfwTerminate), decltype(GL_TRUE), GL_TRUE>;
using GLFWWindow = RAIIWrapper<decltype(glfwCloseWindow), decltype(GL_TRUE), GL_TRUE>;

int main()
{
    GLFWSystem glfw(glfwInit,
                    glfwTerminate,
                    "Failed to initialize GLFW");
}

However, say when a function returns void like Enter/LeaveCriticalSection I'm not sure how to go about and do it in this class. Should I specialize the class for SuccessValueType = void case? Or something with default template parameter should do?

share|improve this question
2  
do you need to have SuccessValueType and successValue as class template parameters? couldn't they be parameters of the constructor? then you could create two separate constructors... just thinking aloud –  Andy Prowl Jan 19 '13 at 21:25
    
Wow, didn't occur to me, lemme try now :) –  legends2k Jan 19 '13 at 21:26
    
@AndyProwl: Oh,wait, but that would make my caller site look ugly :( and also when the success value is known @ compile time, passing it @ runtime is unnecessary. –  legends2k Jan 19 '13 at 21:26
1  
that would be just one more argument, no? GL_TRUE should be enough, its type should be deduced so you won't have to specify it –  Andy Prowl Jan 19 '13 at 21:29
1  
Overjoyed :) correct copying is always relevant to RAII –  Jonathan Wakely Jan 19 '13 at 21:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'd like to note, that

  1. You do not need information on your initialization function in your wrapper class. You only need to know about uninitialization function.

  2. You can create function helpers to instantiate your wrapper.

I came up with the following solution (I liked @ipc exception handling idea)

template <typename UninitF>
struct RAII_wrapper_type
{
    RAII_wrapper_type(UninitF f)
    :_f(f), _empty(false)
    {}
    RAII_wrapper_type(RAII_wrapper_type&& r)
    :_f(r._f), _empty(false)
    {
      r._empty = true;
    }

    RAII_wrapper_type(const RAII_wrapper_type&) = delete;
    void operator=(const RAII_wrapper_type&) = delete;

    ~RAII_wrapper_type()
    {
      if (!_empty) {
        _f();
      }
    }

  private:
    UninitF _f;
    bool _empty; // _empty gets true when _f is `moved out` from the object.
};

template <typename InitF, typename UninitF, typename RType, typename... Args>
RAII_wrapper_type<UninitF> capture(InitF init_f, UninitF uninit_f, RType succ, 
                                   const char* error, Args... args)
{
  if(init_f(args...) != succ) {
    throw std::runtime_error(error);
  }
  return RAII_wrapper_type<UninitF>(uninit_f);
}

template<typename InitF, typename UninitF, typename... Args>
RAII_wrapper_type<UninitF> capture(InitF init_f, UninitF uninit_f, Args... args)
{
  init_f(args...);
  return RAII_wrapper_type<UninitF>(uninit_f);
}

Example:

void t_void_init(int){}
int t_int_init(){ return 1; }
void t_uninit(){}

int main()
{
  auto t1 = capture(t_void_init, t_uninit, 7);
  auto t2 = capture(t_int_init, t_uninit, 0, "some error");
}

Edit

RAII_wrapper_type should have move semantics and we should carefully implement its move constructor to prevent uninit_f from calling several times.

share|improve this answer
    
This is nice and elegant :) I see that a simple function solves the issue here. –  legends2k Jan 19 '13 at 23:16
    
Can you make this non-copyable, when I do the usual deletion of copy ctor and assignment operator functions, the compiler complains returning RAII_wrapper_type from capture, which is also a copy. –  legends2k Jan 20 '13 at 0:20
    
No problem, adding a move ctor solves the issue. –  legends2k Jan 20 '13 at 7:03
    
@legends2k, I've added move issue soultion. –  Lol4t0 Jan 20 '13 at 8:59
    
Isn't _empty redundant? Can't you just check _f != nullptr instead? –  legends2k Jan 20 '13 at 12:34

I would seperate the logic of return-Checking and of RAII-Wrapping

template <typename UninitFuncType>
class RAIIWrapper
{
public:
  template <typename InitFuncType, typename... Args>
  RAIIWrapper(InitFuncType fpInitFunc,
              UninitFuncType fpUninitFunc,
              Args&&... args)
    : fpUninit(std::move(fpUninitFunc))
  {
    static_assert(std::is_void<decltype(fpInitFunc(args...))>::value, "ignored return value");
    fpInitFunc(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
  }

  bool isInitialized() const { return true; } // false is impossible in your implementation

  ~RAIIWrapper() { fpUninit(); } // won't be called if constructor throws

private:
  UninitFuncType fpUninit; // avoid overhead of std::function not needed
};

template <typename InitFuncType, typename UninitFuncType, typename... Args>
RAIIWrapper<UninitFuncType>
raiiWrapper(InitFuncType fpInitFunc,
            UninitFuncType fpUninitFunc,
            Args&&... args)
{
  return RAIIWrapper<typename std::decay<UninitFuncType>::type>
    (std::move(fpInitFunc), std::move(fpUninitFunc), std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

template <typename InitFuncType, typename SuccessValueType>
struct ReturnChecker {
  InitFuncType func;
  SuccessValueType success;
  const char *errorString;
  ReturnChecker(InitFuncType func,
                SuccessValueType success,
                const char *errorString)
    : func(std::move(func)), success(std::move(success)), errorString(errorString) {}

  template <typename... Args>
  void operator()(Args&&... args)
  {
    if (func(std::forward<Args>(args)...) != success)
      throw std::runtime_error(errorString);
  }
};
template <typename InitFuncType, typename SuccessValueType,
          typename Ret = ReturnChecker<InitFuncType, SuccessValueType> >
Ret checkReturn(InitFuncType func, SuccessValueType success, const char *errorString)
{
  return Ret{func, success, errorString};
}

I also added functions to allow type deduction. Here is how to use it:

auto _ = raiiWrapper(checkReturn(glfwInit, GL_TRUE, "Failed to initialize GLFW"),
                     glfwTerminate);

Since having a function object that has a non-void return value causes the static_assert to fail, the following is impossible:

raiiWrapper(glfwInit, glfwTerminate); // fails compiling

If you really want to ignore it, you can add an ignoreReturn function object. Also note that the return code checking can be as sophisticated as you want (like success has to be an even number) since you can write your own return code checker.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for showing me that function<> isn't required and also for a good answer, I like this solution, but let's give it more time, since I still feel this could be done without decoupling the 2 operations. –  legends2k Jan 19 '13 at 21:43
    
Are you sure that function is not required? I tried compiling, clang throws error: data member instantiated with function type 'void ()'. I think you intend it to be used as a function pointer i.e. UninitFuncType*. I didn't want that, hence I used function. –  legends2k Jan 19 '13 at 21:46
1  
Do some std::decay to fix that. –  Yakk Jan 19 '13 at 21:50
    
@ipc: The functor ReturnChecker's operator() should take variable arguments; edited the answer for this. –  legends2k Jan 19 '13 at 22:46
    
That could easily fixed, but I like the solution from @Lol4t0 more, so use them ;) –  ipc Jan 19 '13 at 22:54

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