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I'm creating a game. A game has a GameMap. In order to track state of things on the GameMap, I wanted to create ArrayLists for each of those things. The problem is, I don't want to have to create separate methods for adding, or removing items from each type of ArrayList. I'm a newb so of course the first thing I can think of is the 'instanceof' operator.

Keep in mind that, at present, GameMap is a discrete class, and not an interface, or abstract class. The intent is to instantiate a GameMap object when the game is initialized.

public class GameMap {

//GameMap has a name
private String mapName;

//GameMap has rooms
private ArrayList<Room> roomsOnMap;

//GameMap has items
private ArrayList<Item> itemsOnMap;

//GameMap has people
private ArrayList<Person> peopleOnMap;

//construct GameMap with rooms, items, and people
private GameMap(String mapName, ArrayList someRooms, ArrayList someItems, ArrayList somePeople)
{
    this.mapName = mapName;
    this.roomsOnMap = someRooms;
    this.itemsOnMap = someItems;
    this.peopleOnMap = somePeople;
}

public void addObject(Object o)
{
    //HOW DO I AVOID THIS?
    if(o instanceof Room)
    {
        roomsOnMap.add((Room) o);
    }
    else if(o instanceof Item)
    {
        itemsOnMap.add((Item) o);
    }
    else if(o instanceof Person)
    {
        peopleOnMap.add((Person) o);
    }
}
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7  
I don't see why you don't want separate methods. It would make your code much more readable. –  11684 Jan 19 '13 at 21:59
    
Each object, GameMap, Room, Item, and Person all have ArrayLists in them. That means for each Object I'm having to write separate add, remove methods overloaded for each type of ArrayList. I'm just getting tired of typing. –  Pat K Jan 19 '13 at 22:17
    
You can probably solve that with 1) copy-pasting 2) some smart IDE code generation. –  11684 Jan 19 '13 at 22:18
    
You're right...I think I'm straying from the monotony of this assignment by trying to go down the "how do I do something cool" path. –  Pat K Jan 19 '13 at 22:21
    
I think so too. For what it's worth: if something is a school assignment/homework, please mention that in the question. Homework is to learn from, and you wouldn't learn anything if somebody writes the full code for you, isn't it? (This is not applicable in this case, but just so you know.) –  11684 Jan 19 '13 at 22:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use overloaded methods:

void addObject(Room room) {
  roomsOnMap.add(room);
}

void addObject(Item item) {
  itemsOnMap.add(item);
}

..
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1  
wouldn't recommend this. why not different methods? this is just too error prone –  Karussell Jan 19 '13 at 21:59
1  
You wouldn't recommend function overloading at all? I mean, it does exist for this purpose. –  Jack Jan 19 '13 at 22:00
    
But is not very readable –  11684 Jan 19 '13 at 22:01
    
This is the cleanest approach. Readability is fine. –  Aaron McIver Jan 19 '13 at 22:03
1  
This answer is correct and valid. Having one addObject(Object obj) is a bad idea. What happens if a non supported object type is passed in? What about null? If nulls are allowed which list will it be added to? By using overloaded methods you get compile time type checking. –  Steve Kuo Jan 19 '13 at 23:52

Here is one trick:

Map<Class, ArrayList> map = new HashMap<Class, ArrayList>();
map.put(Room.class, roomsOnMap);
map.put(Item.class, itemsOnMap);
map.put(Person.class, peopleOnMap);

// ...

public void addObject(Object o)
{
    map.get(o.getClass()).add(o); // be aware of NullPointerException here
}

Though, I recommend to use overloaded methods for this.

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1  
And what would happen if you call addObject(new SubclassOfRoom())? This is not a good idea. It completely breaks polymorphism. –  JB Nizet Jan 19 '13 at 22:03

You hunch that instanceOf may not be a very good idea is correct.

If Rooms, Items and Persons are some kind of "GameElements" or "MapElements" you can have a relationship between them via a common parent:

enum ElementType
{
    PERSON, ITEM, ROOM;
}

interface MapElement
{
    public ElementType getType();
}

class Room implements MapElement
{
    public ElementType getType()
    {
        return ElementType.ROOM;
    }
    //other attributes and methods...
}

class Person implements MapElement
{
    public ElementType getType()
    {
        return ElementType.PERSON;
    }
    //other attributes and methods...
}

class Item implements MapElement
{
    public ElementType getType()
    {
        return ElementType.ITEM;
    }
    //other attributes and methods...
}

Then your add method can operate on this interface

public void addObject(MapElement e)
{
    if(e.getType == ElementType.Room)
    {
        roomsOnMap.add((Room) e);
    }
    ...
}

Do this only if the elements are related. If they are not, you should have separate methods. Having a single method to do this may look efficient, but you do not gain anything. To any class using this class (and the developer who writes it), separate add methods (if the elements are not related) is more intuitive than having a generic add with Object as a parameter. You don't lose anything that way, not even a few lines of code, if fact your classes and methods become more straightforward.

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This is no different than what the OP is doing now; semantics. –  Aaron McIver Jan 19 '13 at 22:04
    
@AaronMcIver why not? The question was how to avoid instance of. OP was using instanceOf because he did not have relationship between seemingly related classes. –  Nivas Jan 19 '13 at 22:09
    
The thing we're missing here was that I wanted to instantiate an object GameMap so that I could track the state of things in the game. BUT this does solve help in that I may create an interface like this called GameElements so I can pull the overloaded methods from each of the Room, and Person classes. –  Pat K Jan 19 '13 at 22:26

If you want to avoid using instanceof try the Visitor design pattern.

Here you can find it's description: http://www.oodesign.com/visitor-pattern.html

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