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Using reactive extensions, how can I create an Observable which will continuously call the Read method on a stream and propagate the result to its observers?

Or is this the completely wrong way of approaching things? Should I be implementing my own IObservable?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've never hit a circumstance where implementing my own observable makes sense.

Try this instead:

public static IObservable<byte[]> ObservableRead(Stream stream, int bufferSize)
{
    return Observable.Create<byte[]>(o =>
    {
        var buffer = new byte[bufferSize];
        var read = 0;
        try
        {
            while (true)
            {
                read = stream.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
                if (read == 0)
                {
                    break;
                }
                var results = buffer.Take(read).ToArray();
                //Always return a copy
                //never the buffer for concurrency's sake.
                o.OnNext(results);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            o.OnError(ex);
        }
        finally
        {
            o.OnCompleted();
        }
        return Disposable.Empty;
    });
}
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This is good, but it only runs when there is a subscription. What if I want to have multiple subscribers and have it running all the time? I believe I need to use Observer.Generate instead. Trying to figure it out now. –  NoPyGod Jan 20 '13 at 8:25
1  
@NoPyGod - You don't want multiple subscribers to the one stream. Each would compete to get bytes. You need a single reading stream that you could publish to multiple subscribers. Or you could read the file into memory and move that around. Ideally your signature should be IObservable<byte[]> ObservableRead(Func<Stream> streamFactory, int bufferSize) for this kind of method to be properly functional. –  Enigmativity Jan 20 '13 at 10:45
    
Why do you call OnCompleted() in finally? Wouldn't it work the same if you put it at the end of the try? –  svick Jan 20 '13 at 13:00
    
@svick - Yes, you're right. I'll claim that it is for readability. ;-) –  Enigmativity Jan 21 '13 at 2:00
1  
@NoPyGod - Then you should use the Publish method. That's what it is used for. You should never try to implement your own IObservable. If you try to make the observable hold state and manage multiple observers then you are making your job very difficult. Use the built-in operators. They will help keep your code safe. –  Enigmativity Jan 21 '13 at 3:57

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