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Please see the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

template<int N>
struct C
{
  static constexpr int n = N;
  using this_type_1 = C<n>;
  using this_type_2 = C<N>;
  static this_type_1* p_1;
  static this_type_2* p_2;
};

template<int N>
//C<N>* C<N>::p_1; // <--- error pattern
typename C<N>::this_type_1* C<N>::p_1; // <--- ok pattern

template<int N>
C<N>* C<N>::p_2; // ok

int main(){
  std::cerr
    << typeid(C<0>).name() << "\n"
    << typeid(C<0>::this_type_1).name() << "\n"
    << typeid(C<0>::this_type_2).name() << "\n"
  ;
}

It can compile with g++-4.7.1 and clang++-3.1. But it cannot compile with the commented-out error pattern.

g++ error message is:

test.cpp:15:13: error: conflicting declaration ‘C<N>* C<N>::p_1’
test.cpp:10:23: error: ‘C<N>::p_1’ has a previous declaration as ‘C<N>::this_type_1* C<N>::p_1’
test.cpp:15:13: error: declaration of ‘C<N>::this_type_1* C<N>::p_1’ outside of class is not definition [-fpermissive]

clang++ error message is:

test.cpp:15:13: error: redefinition of 'p_1' with a different type
C<N>* C<N>::p_1; // error
            ^
test.cpp:10:23: note: previous definition is here
  static this_type_1* p_1;
                      ^
1 error generated.

Luckily, I found out a working pattern. But I don't know why The error pattern cannot be compiled. Please tell me the reason on the basis of the C++ language specification.

share|improve this question
    
seems very much like a bug to me, because this line compiles without problems: static_assert(std::is_same<C<5>*, typename C<5>::this_type_1*>::value, "Error!");. what makes me suspicious is that both Clang 3.2 and GCC 4.7.2 complain. VS2012 anyone? –  Andy Prowl Jan 19 '13 at 22:59
    
A compiler probably should not accept a third variant template <int N> typename identity<C<N>*>::type C<N>::p_1;. But where exactly is the line? –  aschepler Jan 19 '13 at 23:15
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The two possible definitions for C<N>::p_1 are not as equivalent as they appear, because C<N>::n may be explicitly specialized at any time before the first instantiation for a given N.

template<int N>
struct C
{
  static constexpr int n = N;
  using this_type_1 = C<n>;
  static this_type_1* p_1;
};

template<int N>
C<N>* C<N>::p_1; // ERROR

template<>
constexpr int C<5>::n = 6;

int main()
{
    C<6>* p = C<5>::p_1;
}

If the compiler had accepted that definition of C<N>::p_1, it would be possible for its declared type to be incorrect.

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This qualifies as a bug IMO, which affects both Clang (3.2) and GCC (4.7.2). My claim is supported by the following evidence (I tried to reduce the code from the OP's question to the minimum):

#include <type_traits>

template<int N>
struct C
{
    static constexpr int n = N;
    using T = C<n>;
    static T* p;
};

// This compiles, which proves that (C<N>* == typename C<N>::T*)
static_assert(std::is_same<C<5>*, typename C<5>::T*>::value, "Error!");

template<int N>
typename C<N>::T* C<N>::p; // OK
//       C<N>*    C<N>::p; // ERROR! Contradicts the above hypothesis

int main()
{
}

The static_assert() expression does not cause any compilation error, which means the two types are indeed identical. But if that is the case, there should be no difference between the two ways of defining the static member C<N>::p.

Also, this code does compile:

#include <type_traits>

template<int N>
struct C
{
    using T = C<N>;
    static T* p;
};

// This compiles, which proves that (C<N>* == typename C<N>::T*)
static_assert(std::is_same<C<5>*, typename C<5>::T*>::value, "Error!");

template<int N>
C<N>* C<N>::p; // OK now

int main()
{
}

Which means the problem is related to the usage of a constexpr static variable (n in this case) as a template argument.

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