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I have a simple Message class and a simple SerialPort Class. I also have a specific message subclass and a specific serial port subclass (CustomMessage & CustomSerialPort):

class Message
{
public: 
    uint8 getLength() const ( return m_length; }
    const uint8* getData() const { return m_contents; }
...
}

class SerialPort
{
public:
    bool OpenSerial(int32& errcode);  
    bool ReadFromSerial(int32& errcode, Message& msg);  
    bool WriteToSerial(int32& errcode, Message& msg, 
        uint32* const nBytesWritten);
...
}

Here are the custom classes. Note that I overloaded the WriteToSerial() to take CustomMessage instead of just Message.

class CustomSerialPort : public SerialPort
{
public:
    bool WriteToSerial(int32& errcode, CustomMessage& msg, 
        uint32* const nBytesWritten);
...
}

class CustomMessage : public Message 
{
    // lots of stuff for messages to specific device
}

Also important, the implementation of CustomSerial::WriteToSerial and CustomMessage::toMessage()

bool CustomSerialPort::WriteToSerial(int32& errcode, CustomMessage& msg, 
    uint32* const nBytesWritten)
{
    SerialPort::WriteToSerial(errcode, msg.toMessage(), nBytesWritten);
}

Message& CustomMessage::toMessage() 
{
    Message* msg = new Message(m_contents, m_length);
    return *msg;
}

You can see that I call the WriteToSerial of the SerialPort class and send it a CustomMessage that has been converted to a Message.

My question is this: where should I delete the message that I created to pass to SerialPort::WriteToSerial?

Or, should I do something more like this:

bool CustomSerialPort::WriteToSerial(int32& errcode, CustomMessage& msg, 
    uint32* const nBytesWritten)
{
    // don't use new
    Message m(msg);

    SerialPort::WriteToSerial(errcode, m, nBytesWritten);
    // deleted when goes out of scope
}

Then, with option 2, if my understanding is correct, I just need to make a Message constructor that takes a parameter of CustomMessage... wait... that seems weird.. taking a child class object parameter in a parent class constructor. Do I need to rethink this?

share|improve this question
    
Option 2 would be an example of the slicing problem so I wouldn't recommend using that. – Csq Jan 19 '13 at 22:55
    
@Csq I think I'm going to go with billz answer below, but what if I don't care about the information I'm losing to slicing (e.g. I'm storing everything I need in a buffer), including all the message specific stuff that is stored in member variables in CustomMessage, kinda like a serialize function. Then would slicing it be so bad, if I plan to send it immediately after? – nckturner Jan 19 '13 at 23:03
    
no, it would work correctly but such strange solutions cause bad maintainability to your code so generally you should avoid them. – Csq Jan 19 '13 at 23:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need to new Message inside toMessage() and you don't need to delete it.

Change

Message& CustomMessage::toMessage() 
{
    Message* msg = new Message(m_contents, m_length);
    return *msg;
}

bool CustomSerialPort::WriteToSerial(int32& errcode, CustomMessage& msg, 
    uint32* const nBytesWritten);

to

Message CustomMessage::toMessage() 
{
    return Message(m_contents, m_length);
}

bool CustomSerialPort::WriteToSerial(int32& errcode, const CustomMessage& msg, 
                                                     ^^^ const
    uint32* const nBytesWritten)

When toMessage() is called in WriteToSerial, it will be bind till WriteToSerial() function finishes.

Also you need to add const qualifier to all functions take Message as input

class SerialPort
{
public:
    bool OpenSerial(int32& errcode);  
    bool ReadFromSerial(int32& errcode, const Message& msg);  
    bool WriteToSerial(int32& errcode, const Message& msg, 
        uint32* const nBytesWritten);
...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do I really want: bool ReadFromSerial(int32& errcode, const Message& msg); when I need to add info to that message that is read from the serial? Won't adding const prevent that? – nckturner Jan 19 '13 at 23:21

Whenever possible, DON'T use new. Only time you should use new is: 1. you can't know how many objects you need beforehand, and the possible range is so vastly different between "few" and "many" that it's not reasonable to have a fixed size array or similar. 2. When the object has to last longer than your current function, and it's not plausible to pass in the object from a lower down function. 3. The type of the object can't be known before the object is created (particularly relevant in polymorphism).

Not using new helps in that you don't have to remember to delete it later.

If you do use new, then it's best if it's inside a resource-holding object - smart pointer or something similar - that way, again, you don't have to remember to delete it.

share|improve this answer

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